Programs of Instruction


Learning Outcomes

Learning outcomes relate to specific skills and competencies students are expected to acquire during the course of their study for the Juris Doctor degree. Students in the JD program at the George Washington University Law School, by the time they complete their degree requirements, are expected to possess:

  1. the necessary knowledge of substantive and procedural law to be prepared for commencement of the practice of law;
  2. the ability to engage in professionally proficient legal analysis and reasoning;
  3. an understanding of the important role of lawyers as problem solvers;
  4. a facility with written and oral communication in the practice of law;
  5. comprehension of the lawyer’s professional responsibilities to clients, tribunals, the legal system and non-clients;
  6. several of the professional skills needed for effective client representation, such as proficiency in legal research, fact development and analysis, client and witness interviewing, negotiation, trial practice, advocacy of client positions or objectives, document drafting, conflict resolution and organization and management of legal work; and
  7. the capacity to self-evaluate their skills in learning and lawyering, and to develop skills in collaboration and in representing and working with persons from diverse cultures and perspectives.

Planning a Balanced Program

After the completion of the required curriculum, JD students have a vast domain of courses to choose from at the law school. The fact that a large number of courses are offered does not mean that all courses have the same importance. Rather, the large curriculum offers students substantial freedom to tailor their programs to their interests and future needs.

The faculty recommends that all students take programs that give them a strong foundation in the standard subject areas of the law. Although students should avoid excessive specialization, some students choose to pursue a particular area of the law in special depth or breadth because of career inclinations or for the intellectual values associated with specialized study. The freedom in course selection permitted by the elective policy at the law school places the responsibility for planning a coherent academic program on the individual student. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with members of the faculty or the administration for guidance on their programs.

Consistent with its commitment to a balanced program, the law school generally offers important elective courses every academic year. These courses survey the most important subjects in the law. The faculty recommends that JD students take a large number of these courses as part of their individual program. Some are prerequisites for specialized courses, clinics or simulation courses and so should be taken early in a student’s course of elective study.

Elective Course Listing
 

 

Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure (6362)

Administrative Law (6400), Antitrust Law (6402)

Conflict of Laws (6234)

Constitutional Law II (6380)

Corporations (6250)

Creditors’ Rights and Debtors’ Protection (6284)

Criminal Procedure (6360)

Environmental Law (6430)

 

 

Evidence (6230)

Family Law (6348)

Federal Courts (6232)

Federal Income Taxation (6300)

International Law (6520)

International Business Transactions (6522)

Securities Regulation (6252)

Trusts and Estates (6342)

The law faculty also believes that it is important that students understand the relationship between law and other disciplines. History, philosophy, economics, medicine, the social sciences, the humanities and other fields offer perspectives on the law and the development of legal institutions. Accordingly, the faculty recommends that students take one or more inter- disciplinary courses

Interdisciplinary Courses
 

 

Art, Cultural Heritage and the Law Seminar (6488)

Feminist Legal Theory (6608)

Genetics and the Law (6616)

Jurisprudence (6590)

Jurisprudence Seminar (6592)

History of the Common Law (6601)

Law and Anthropology (6612)

Law and Economics (6598)

 

 

Law and Literature (6606)

Law and Medicine (6617)

Law and Psychiatry (6614)

Law and Accounting (6602)

Race, Racism and American Law (6595)

Sexuality and the Law (6394)

U.S. Legal History (6591)

The curriculum offers a large variety of clinical courses, simulation courses and field placement options in which students have the opportunity to learn lawyering and other advocacy skills in several contexts. These courses permit students to complement the theoretical study of law with experience in interviewing clients, investigating facts, dealing with adverse parties, contacting government agencies, negotiating on behalf of clients and participating in real or hypothetical court and administrative proceedings. The faculty recommends that students take one or more such courses

Clinical Courses, Simulation Courses and Field Placement Options
 

 

Advanced Appellate Advocacy (6653)

Alternative Dispute Resolution (6647)

Civil Access to Justice Clinic (6711)

Civil and Human Rights Clinic (6633)

Client Interviewing and Counseling (6650)

College of Trial Advocacy (6683)

Criminal Appeals and Post-Conviction Services Clinic (6625)

Criminal Defense and Justice Clinic (6710)

Family Justice Litigation Clinic (6624)

Field Placement (6668)

Health Rights Law Clinic (6631)

Immigration Clinic (6630)

Intellectual Property and Technology Law Clinic (6709)

Intensive Clinical Placement (6638)

 

 

Legal Drafting (6652)

Mediation (6646)

Mock Trial Competition (6645)

Moot Court (6644)

Negotiations (6648)

Pre-Trial Advocacy (6643)

Prisoner and Reentry Clinic (6623)

Public Justice Advocacy Clinic (6622)

Rising for Justice (6634)

Small Business and Community Economic Development Clinic (6621)

Trial Advocacy (6640)

Vaccine Injury Litigation Clinic (6626)

Career Planning and Course Selection

The law school offers information and guidance regarding upper-level requirements, course selection, crafting a balanced academic program and defining career objectives. Every spring, first-year students are provided with an overview of requirements for graduation and pointers on academic planning, followed by opportunities for one-on-one advising. Students may also consult members of the faculty for course and career planning. In addition, the Career Center provides a central storehouse of information regarding many types of legal careers.

To assist students in choosing upper-class courses and planning graduate programs of study, the law school’s courses are listed below according to principal practice areas, with a brief introduction to the gateway courses in each area. Each listing begins with foundational courses in the practice area, and moves next to advanced courses typically offered just once each year, including seminars and clinics related to the practice area. Some courses are listed in several practice areas.

Many courses listed in the course description section of this Bulletin under the headings Law and Other Disciplines (Law 6590–617) and Experiential Learning and Simulations Courses (Law 6640–67) are not repeated in the practice areas listed below. This is because they concern perspectives on the law or lawyering skills that are applicable to all of these practice areas. Students should, therefore, consider taking courses from these categories to complement courses taken within specific practice areas.

Students should consult course descriptions to determine the prerequisites and eligibility criteria.


Clinical Program

The George Washington University Law School’s Jacob Burns Community Legal Clinics provide students with the opportunity to further their courses of study in substantive law and lawyering skills while representing clients in real cases. In each of the law school’s 10 clinical programs, students are enrolled in a rigorous educational curriculum designed to teach the law and skills students need to represent clients in adversarial and transactional cases and in advocacy projects. Clinics, for which students receive between two to six academic credits, are directed, taught and supervised by law school faculty who have extensive careers in their practice areas and who are leaders in their fields. The law school offers clinics in a wide variety of subject areas including criminal appellate, small business, domestic violence, family law, vaccine injury, health rights, immigration, international human rights, housing, prisoner reentry, intellectual property rights and civil litigation. Under local practice rules, students are permitted to handle all phases of representation including client interviewing and counseling, taking and defending depositions, drafting legal pleadings and contracts, arguing motions and appeals, conducting negotiations and taking cases to trial. All such work is conducted under the close supervision and support of clinical faculty. Students represent a broad range of clients on a pro bono basis, with a particular focus on providing legal representation to low-income and traditionally marginalized populations who might otherwise be unrepresented or face other barriers in accessing justice.

The law school’s Clinical Programs allow students to gain extensive practice experience prior to graduation which enhances their job qualifications and their ability to think, problem-solve and counsel like lawyers. The Clinics’ 8:1 student-faculty ratio provides students with the opportunity to work closely with law school faculty and to receive careful and supportive supervision.

Students are eligible to take clinics during their 2L and 3L years, although some clinics are available only to 3Ls. Students should carefully review clinic eligibility requirements on the portal.


Field Placement Program

The George Washington University Law School’s Field Placement Program (“Program”) provides students with the opportunity to work closely with judges or practicing attorneys as legal externs in government, judicial and non-profit organizations while earning academic credit. The Program is designed to enhance the educational experience of its students through exposure to the actual practice of law.

The primary educational objectives of the program are:

  • to provide students with the opportunity to gain experience in different substantive areas of law and legal process;
  • to develop legal research, writing, interviewing, counseling and investigative skills;
  • to deal with issues of professional responsibility in a practice setting; and, to engage in reflective lawyering.

The Field Placement Program consists of two parts: the student’s externship work as a part of the Field Placement course and the corequisite course (required for JD students only). In the Field Placement course, students earn academic credit for their externship work with judges or practicing lawyers as legal externs in government, judicial and non-profit organizations. The student’s externship experience also includes regular supervision from a licensed attorney or judge who is assigned to that student by the placement site.

In addition to the Field Placement course, students concurrently enroll in a corequisite course that directly aligns with their externship. The corequisite course provides students an opportunity to reflect on their externships and connect their externship experiences with academic concepts they are learning in law school. Each corequisite course has its own syllabus and course assignments, as determined by the corequisite course professor.

During the Spring semester, JD degree candidates may obtain academic credit for business law-related externships through the Field Placement Program in the GW Law in New York (GWNY) program.

LLM candidates from the Business and Finance, Environmental and Energy, General, Government Procurement, Intellectual Property, International and Comparative and National Security, Cybersecurity and Foreign Relations Law Programs may obtain academic credit for qualifying externships through the Field Placement Program upon written approval by their LLM dean or program director. Students in other LLM programs should contact their LLM dean or program directors for additional information.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Public Interest and Public Service

Public interest and public service transcend formal practice areas, such as those set out in the section that follows. For students interested in careers in public interest or public service, additional thought and guidance may prove useful when constructing an individualized program of study based upon the law school’s extensive set of curricular offerings.

Participation in the law school’s Clinical and Field Placement Programs is strongly encouraged for students who wish to practice in this area. The Jacob Burns Community Legal Clinics provide students with opportunities to engage in various types of legal practice, services and policymaking in a variety of different subject areas. The Field Placement Program combines classroom instruction with real-world work experience to provide a uniquely immersive educational experience. Both of these programs provide students with robust opportunities to serve the public in an experiential learning environment.

Students considering a career in public interest lawyering or working for the government at any level also are encouraged to take foundational courses in administrative, federal income tax and constitutional law, as public interest lawyering will often involve these subject areas. Finally, students are encouraged to participate in the law school’s pro bono program, which provides students with the opportunity to volunteer for nonprofit or government organizations, work on projects that are organized by student groups on their own or otherwise contribute to projects for nonprofit organizations doing legal work.


JD Concentrations

JD students may earn concentration in certain substantive fields. Earning a concentration requires students to complete a minimum number of credit hours in the concentration area, after completion of the required first-year curriculum. Specific requirements are established by the concentration directors and coordinators, listed below, who are responsible for the administration of the concentration.

Students who wish to receive a concentration are required to declare that intention with the concentration director prior to their final semester in law school, but preferably by the end of their second year. The concentration directors will advise interested students on the concentration area, program requirements and course options. When the student completes the required concentration courses, the student will submit to the concentration director a form that lists the concentration courses and semester taken, with a copy of their transcript. See the respective sections for each program in this Bulletin’s Courses of Instruction, Practice Areas section, for information on requirements. A JD candidate may select only one area of concentration and that will appear on the transcript. The Concentration Directors and Coordinators are as follow for the 2022–2023 academic year:

 

 

Business and Finance Law
Professor Dalia Tsuk Mitchell

Energy Law
Assistant Dean Donna Attanasio

Environmental Law
Assistant Dean Randall Abate

Family Law
Associate Dean Laurie Kohn

Government Procurement Law
Assistant Dean Jessica Tillipman

Health Law
Professor Sonia Suter

 

 

Intellectual Property Law
Associate Dean John Whealan

International and Comparative Law
Associate Dean Rosa Celorio

International Business Law
Associate Dean Rosa Celorio and Professor Dalia Tsuk Mitchell

National Security and Cybersecurity Law
Associate Dean Lisa Schenck

National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law
Associate Dean Lisa Schenck


Practice Areas

Courses pertinent to selected practices areas are listed below. JD concentrations are available for selected practice areas. The requirements for the concentration for JD students is described for those practice areas for which the concentration is available. Not all practice areas offer a JD concentration.

Administrative Law and Government Regulation

This large and important field deals with the process by which government regulates the activities of businesses or individuals. Administrative Law (6400) is the foundation course for all study in this area. Other key survey courses include Antitrust Law (6402), Legislation (6416) and Trademark Law and Unfair Competition (6474). Advanced courses explore the administrative process in the context of a single commercial activity such as health care or the telecommunications industry. Almost all of the courses included in the closely related practice areas of environmental law, government contract law, intellectual property law, labor law and taxation, which are set out separately in this practice area listing, could fairly be termed species of administrative law and government regulation.

Foundation Courses

 

 

Administrative Law (6400)

Antitrust Law (6402)

 

 

Legislation (6416)

Trademark Law and Unfair Competition (6474)

 

Advanced Courses

 

 

Voting Rights Law (6387)

Higher Education Law (6389)

Food and Drug Law (6408)

Health Law and Policy (6410)

Health Care Law Seminar (6411)**

Telecommunications Law (6414)

Legislative Analysis and Drafting (6418)

Campaign Finance Law (6419)

Congressional Investigations Seminar (6420)

Lawyers, Lobbying and the Law (6421)

Local Government Law (6422)

 

 

Public Law Seminar (6426)** (selected sections)

Selected Topics in Public Law (6427)** (selected sections)

Environmental Law (6430)

Energy Law and Regulation (6438)

Law in Cyberspace (6485)

Information Privacy Law (6486)

Race, Racism and American Law (6595)

Genetics and the Law (6616)

Public Justice Advocacy Clinic (6622)

Government Lawyering (6671)

Homeland Security Law and Policy (6876)

 

**Multiple sections for these course numbers may be offered during a given academic year; please consult the course schedule for specific course names.

Advanced Torts

Personal injury and property damage claims are a major part of modern civil litigation. The courses in this practice area all build upon the basic first-year Torts (6206) course and complete the study of non-contractual private liabilities. Insurance (6298) deals in part with the process of shifting the risks associated with such liabilities.

Advanced Courses

 

 

Complex Litigation (6236)

Remedies (6238)

Admiralty (6293)

Insurance (6298)

Products Liability (6354)

 

 

Environmental and Toxic Torts (6449) Genetics and the Law (6616)

Law and Medicine (6617)

Vaccine Injury Litigation Clinic (6626)

Alternative Dispute Resolution

The courses in this area explore the rapidly growing field of dispute resolution outside the courtroom. Lawyers have always resolved most of their clients’ disputes without trial, by negotiation and settlement. These courses formally train students in these and related dispute resolution techniques. Mediation (6646), Alternative Dispute Resolution (6647) and Negotiations (6648) are the foundation for all courses in this area. The remaining courses apply techniques learned in the foundation courses in different contexts.

Foundation Courses

 

 

Mediation (6646)

Alternative Dispute Resolution (6647)

 

 

Negotiations (6648)

Advanced Courses

 

 

Environmental Negotiations (6458)

International Arbitration (6556)

International Negotiations (6558)

 

 

Health Rights Law Clinic (6631)

Client Interviewing and Counseling (6650)

The following courses are open only to LLM degree candidates:

 

 

Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution (6676)

Ethics in Adjudication and Settlement (6678)

 

 

Negotiation and Conflict Management Systems Design (6681)

International Dispute Resolution (6682)

Business and Finance (including Commercial Law)

This practice area concentrates on the legal rules governing the formation, organization, financing and operation of most modern businesses and the operation of the marketplace, including transactions between businesses and between a consumer and a business. Corporations is both the basic course and should be regarded as a prerequisite (or corequisite) for virtually all of the advanced courses in this field.

Other highly recommended courses sometimes described as foundational in business and finance law include:

Securities Regulation (6252), Secured Transactions (6280), Banking Law (6290), Business Planning (6296), Federal Income Taxation (6300) and Law and Accounting (6602). Courses sometimes described as foundational in commercial law include courses focused on various portions of the Uniform Commercial Code (including Secured Transactions (6280) [Articles 2A and 9], Commercial Paper—Payment Systems (6282) [primarily Articles 3, 4 and 4A], and Creditors’ Rights and Debtors’ Protection (6284) [Article 9], as well as Business Bankruptcy and Reorganization (6285) and Banking Law (6290).

A course sometimes described as foundational in international business and commercial law is International Business Transactions (6522).

For students interested in the practice of business law (including finance as well as commercial law) in New York City, please see this Bulletin’s description of our GW in New York program. The program includes the advanced course Business Lawyering (6810) as the corequisite to New York business law field placements and other elective course offerings during the Spring semester in New York City.

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in Business and Finance Law by successfully completing a minimum of 12 credits from among the courses below, including Corporations (6250), two credits of experiential learning from among the courses noted with two asterisks (**) listed below or included on the Records Office’s current list of Courses that Fulfill Experiential Learning Credits and two credits graded on the basis of a research paper that meets the standards for the law school’s upper-level writing requirement, either written in conjunction with one of the courses listed below or, with advance approval of the program director, written for a journal, independent legal writing or a course that is not included in the list below. Students may use the same paper to fulfill the writing requirement for both the concentration and the JD.

Courses

 

 

Corporations (6250)

Securities Regulation (6252)

Corporate Finance (6254)

Mergers and Acquisitions (6256)

Regulation of Mutual Funds and Investment Advisers (6260)

Regulation of Derivatives (6261)

Corporation Law Seminar (6262)

Selected Topics in Corporate Law (6263)

Securities Law Seminar (6264)

Selected Topics in Securities Law (6267)

Employee Benefit Plans (6272)

Secured Transactions (6280)

Commercial Paper—Payment Systems (6282)

Creditors’ Rights and Debtors’ Protection (6284)

Business Bankruptcy and Reorganization (6285)

Consumer Protection Law (6286)

Selected Topics in Banking Law (6289)

Banking Law (6290)

Unincorporated Business Organizations and Agency Law (6294)

Sports and the Law (6295) Business Planning (6296)**

Insurance (6298)

Federal Income Taxation (6300)

Corporate Taxation (6302)

Partnership and LLC Taxation (6304)

International Taxation (6312)

Nonprofit Organizations: Law and Taxation (6314)

State and Local Taxation (6316)

Selected Topics in Tax Policy Law (6317)

Tax Policy Seminar (6318)

Modern Real Estate Transactions (6330)

Land Use Law (6332)

Law of Real Estate Financing (6334)

Reading Group (6351)*

White Collar Crime (6364)

Antitrust Law (6402)

Advanced Antitrust Law Seminar (6403)

 

 

Selected Topics in Advanced Antitrust Law (6405)

Regulated Industries (6406)

Public Law Seminar (6426)*

Selected Topics in Public Law (6427)*

Trade and Sustainable Development (6435)

Energy Law Seminar (6441)*

Environmental Issues in Business Transactions (6452)

Entertainment Law (6475)

Anti-Corruption and Compliance (6511)

International Money Laundering, Corruption and Terrorism (6521)

International Business Transactions (6522)

The International Competition Law Regime (6523)

International Commercial Law (6524)

International Trade Law (6526)

Advanced International Trade Law (6527)

Law of the European Union (6534)

International Finance (6541)

International Banking and Investment Law (6542)

International Investment Law and Arbitration (6544)

International Project Finance (6545) Chinese Business Law (6549)

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation (6553)

International Arbitration (6556)**

Introduction to Transactional Islamic Law (6557)

International Negotiations (6558)**

International Business Transaction Seminar (6564)

Law and Economics (6598)

Law and Accounting (6602)**

Small Business and Community Economic Development Clinic (6621)**

Negotiations (6648)**

Legal Drafting (Transactional) (6652)**

Legal Drafting (Mergers and

Acquisitions) (6652)**

Field Placement (6668)***

Business Lawyering (6810)**

*Select sections with the permission of the program director.

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in International Business Law by successfully completing 12 credits in Business and Finance Law and 12 credits in International and Comparative Law, for a total of 24 credits. As part of the required 24 credits, students must complete two credits of experiential learning and a writing requirement focused on International Business Law through courses included on the Business and Finance course list above or the International and Comparative Law course list below.

Students must satisfy the requirements of both the Business and Finance Law and the International and Comparative Law JD concentrations (e.g., students must take Corporations (6250), International Law (6520) and courses designated by the program directors as comparative). Students interested in this concentration must notify the program directors during their 2L year.

Constitutional Law and Civil Rights

This major field deals with the proper role of various branches of government and the protection of individual rights and liberties. Building upon the required course on federal powers, Constitutional Law I, the courses in this practice area explore the constitutional structure of our federal government and its relationship to the states. A related set of courses addresses the protection of individual civil rights.

 

Foundation Courses

 

 

Federal Courts (6232)

Conflict of Laws (6234)

 

 

Constitutional Law II (6380)

Legislation (6416)

Advanced Courses

 

 

Family, Child and State (6349)

Domestic Violence Law (6350)

Law of Separation of Powers (6384)

Voting Rights Law (6387)

Employment Discrimination Law (6390)

Law and Religion (6393)

Sexuality and the Law (6394)

Constitutional Law and the Supreme Court (6395)

Federal Indian Law (6397)

Constitutional Law Seminar (6399)**

Lawyers, Lobbying and the Law (6421)

Law in Cyberspace (6485)

Immigration Law I (6538)

 

 

Immigration Law II (6539)

History of the U.S. Constitution (6594)

Race, Racism and American Law (6595)

Immigration Clinic (6630)

Disability Rights Law (6635)

Public Interest Lawyering (6670)

National Security Law (6870)

U.S. Foreign Relations Law (6871)

Military Justice (6873)

Counterterrorism Law (6875)

Homeland Security Law and Policy (6876)

Intelligence Law (6878)

**Multiple sections for these course numbers may be offered during a given academic year; please consult the course schedule for specific course names.

Criminal Law and Procedure

Building upon the required course on substantive criminal law, the courses in this practice area explore the rules governing criminal procedure, the sociology of crime and the application of the criminal law to particular conduct, such as environmental crimes and the use of drugs. The survey courses, Criminal Procedure and Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure, are the starting point for study in this area.

Foundation Courses

 

 

Criminal Procedure (6360)

Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure (6362)

 

 

 

Advanced Courses

 

 

White Collar Crime (6364)

Criminal Tax Litigation (6365)

Computer Crime (6369)

Forensic Science (6370)

Drugs and the Law (6372)

Criminal Law and Procedure Seminar (6379)**

International Criminal Law (6554)

 

 

Human Trafficking Law (6572)

Rising for Justice (6634)

Criminal Defense and Justice Clinic (6710) Military Justice (6873)

Comparative Military Law (6874) Counterterrorism Law (6875)

Transnational Security (6885)

Domestic Terrorism (6886)

Problems Trying Terrorists in Article III Courts (6887)

**Multiple sections for these course numbers may be offered during a given academic year; please consult the course schedule for specific course names.

Environmental and Energy Law

Foundational courses survey the range of statutes, regulatory practices and judicial decisions in the environment and energy field. Advanced courses and seminars provide in-depth coverage of several environmental statutes as well as a number of environment and energy practice areas.

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in Environmental Law by successfully completing 14 credits of coursework in Environmental Law, including three required courses—Environmental Law (6430), Natural Resources Law (6440) and Administrative Law (6400)—two credits of experiential learning related to environmental or energy law (Field Placement (6668)) or any Environmental or Energy law class that is designated as an “E” course) and two credits graded on the basis of a research paper that meets the standards for the law school’s upper-level writing requirement, either written in conjunction with one of the courses below or, with advance approval of the program director, written for a journal, independent legal writing or a course that is not included in the list below on an environmental law topic. Students may use the same paper to fulfill the writing requirement for both the concentration and the JD.

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in Energy Law by successfully completing 14 credits of coursework in Energy Law and Environmental Law, which must include Energy Law and Regulation (6438) and Administrative Law (6400).

In addition, students are required to take at least four credits from the following courses:

Energy Law Seminar (6441),**Oil and Gas Law (6443), Atomic Energy Law (6459) and Air Pollution Control (6432).

Finally, students must have two credits of experiential learning related to environmental or energy law (Field Placement (6668) or any Environmental or Energy law class that is designated as an “E” course) and two credits graded on the basis of a research paper that meets the standards for the law school’s upper-level writing requirement, either written in conjunction with one of the courses below or, with advance approval of the program director, written for a journal, independent legal writing or a course that is not included in the list below on an energy law topic. Students may use the same paper to fulfill the writing requirement for both the concentration and the JD.

 

Foundation Courses

 

 

Administrative Law (6400)

Environmental Law (6430)

 

 

Energy Law and Regulation (6438)

Natural Resources Law (6440)

Advanced Courses

 

 

Regulated Industries (6406)

Animal Law Seminar (6424)

Wildlife and Ecosystems Law (6431)

Air Pollution Control (6432)

Water Pollution Control (6434)

Trade and Sustainable Development (6435)

Coastal, Navigation and Wetlands Resource Law (6437)

Energy Law Seminar (6441)**

Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA) (6442)

Oil and Gas Law (6443)

Regulation of Toxic Substances Risk (6444)

Environmental and Toxic Torts (6449)

Federal Facilities Environmental Law Issues (6450)

 

 

Selected Topics in Energy Law (6451)**

Environmental Issues in Business Transactions (6452)

International Environmental Law (6454)

International Climate Change Law (6455)

Environmental Negotiations (6458)

Atomic Energy Law (6459)

Selected Topics in Environmental Law (6461)**

Environmental Crimes (6464)

Environmental Law Seminar (6466)**

Environmental Lawyering (6469)

International Trade Law (6526)

Advanced International Trade Law (6527)

International Project Finance (6545)

 

**Multiple sections for these course numbers may be offered during a given academic year; please consult the course schedule for specific course names. For guidance on which seminars and selected topic courses meet the concentration requirements, students should consult with their program director.

For students interested in the practice of energy law, the GW Law-University of Groningen Student Exchange Program provides a unique opportunity for students to study European Union law and international law, with an emphasis on environmental and energy law at the University of Groningen. For more information, see the Summer Session and Programs Outside DC.

Family Law

This cluster of courses investigates the role of the law in family matters and the inheritance of wealth.

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in Family Law. Students must successfully complete a minimum of 12 credits from an approved list of courses maintained by the Family Law Concentration Coordinator, including Family Law (6348), at least two credits of experiential learning,* and a supplemental requirement that can be satisfied either by writing an approved paper or successfully completing the Family Justice Litigation Clinic (6624), the Civil Access to Justice Clinic – Family Division (6711) or the Domestic Violence Project (6674) and writing a shorter paper.

In addition to the courses listed below, credits earned through study abroad programs, additional courses and relevant moot court competitions may also qualify, with approval of the Family Law Concentration Coordinator. Students are expected to consult with the Coordinator in advance, and provide proof after completion, to ensure that the program, course or moot court competition qualifies toward the Concentration requirements. The Concentration Coordinator will provide students with additional information on fulfilling concentration requirements.

 

Foundation Courses

 

 

Trusts and Estates (6342)

Family Law (6348)

 

 

Family, Child and State (6349)

Advanced Courses

 

 

Trusts, Estates and Professional Responsibility (6343)

Estate Planning and Drafting (6346)

Domestic Violence Law (6350)

Family Law Seminar (6352)

Elder Law (6353)

Sexuality and the Law (6394)

International Family Law (6533)

 

 

Feminist Legal Theory (6608)

Family Justice Litigation Clinic (6624)

Legal Drafting (Family Law) (6652–12)

Domestic Violence Project (6674)

Field Placement (6668)

Civil Access to Justice Clinic (Family Division) (6711)

*Full requirements concerning credit for experiential learning are available from the Coordinator.

Government Procurement Law

The courses in this practice area explore the body of rules regulating the process by which the federal government enters into contracts with private parties and oversees the performance of those contracts. Government Contracts is a one-semester survey course for students seeking a general overview of the law in this area; those preferring a more in-depth course of study may choose instead the Formation of Government Contracts and Performance of Government Contracts sequence. Advanced courses in this area include a series of seminars and courses designed to provide students with a richer understanding of how procurement systems operate, both in the U.S. and abroad, and selected topics courses designed to provide students with varying perspectives on emerging issues in the law.

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in Government Procurement Law by successfully completing a minimum of 12 credits of Government Procurement Law courses, including Formation of Government Contracts (6502), Performance of Government Contracts (6503), two credits of an experiential learning government procurement course marked with an asterisk (*) in the list of courses below (or a government procurement Field Placement) and a research paper that meets the standards for the law school’s legal writing requirement (e.g., at least 8,000 words), either written in conjunction with a 2-credit government procurement course graded on the basis of a research paper, or, with the approval of the Assistant Dean for Government Procurement Law, written for a journal, independent legal writing or a course that is not included in the list below on a government procurement law topic. Up to two credits earned through a government procurement-related Field Placement (6668) may count toward the concentration credits, with the approval of the Assistant Dean for Government Procurement Law.

 

Foundation Courses

 

 

Government Contracts (6500)

Formation of Government Contracts (6502)

Performance of Government Contracts (6503)

 

 

Government Contracts Overview (6518)

Analytical Writing (MSL only) (6519)

Advanced Courses

 

 

Government Contracts Advocacy (6505)*

Government Contracts Cost & Pricing (6506)

Comparative Public Procurement (6508)

Government Contracts Seminar (6509)**

Graduate Government Contracts Placement (6510)

Anti-Corruption and Compliance (6511)

 

 

Government Procurement of Intellectual Property Seminar (6512)*

Selected Topics in Government Procurement (6513)***

Federal Grants Law (6514)

Government Contracts Moot Court (6515)*

Procurement in International Development (6516)

**For 2022–2023, Government Contracts Seminars may include Foreign Government Contracting, State and Local Procurement, Sustainable Procurement and Procurement Reform.

***For 2022–2023, Selected Topics in Government Procurement may include Acquisition Policymaking, Suspension and Debarment in Government Procurement, Other Transactions, Introduction to Federal Appropriations Law,* and Negotiations in Government Procurement.*

 

Health Law

The following practice area is relevant to students interested in health law and to students enrolled in the JD–MPH joint-degree program or pursuing a graduate certificate from the Milken Institute School of Public Health. The structure and delivery of health care has generated a wide range of legal concerns related to health care, including laws and regulations that govern the healthcare industry as a whole, health care providers, hospitals and health systems, health insurers, managed care companies, nursing and long-term care facilities, and home health care providers. Some of the recommended courses pertain specifically to the practice of health law; others, while not specific to health law, are important for a solid foundation in this area and an understanding of the needs of patients.

Foundation Courses

 

 

Food and Drug Law (6408)

Health Law and Policy (6410)

 

 

Health Care Law Seminar (6411)**

Law and Medicine (6617)

Related Courses

 

 

Evidence (6230)

Corporations (6250)

Employee Benefit Plans (6272)

Insurance (6298)

Federal Income Taxation (6300)

Trusts and Estates (6342)

Family Law (6348)

Family Law Seminar (6352)**

Elder Law (6353)

Administrative Law (6400)

 

 

Antitrust (6402)

Environmental and Toxic Torts (6449)

Law and Psychiatry (6614)

Genetics and the Law (6616)

Vaccine Injury Litigation Clinic (6626)

Health Rights Law Clinic (6631)

Disability Rights Law (6635)

Client Interviewing and Counseling (6650)

Civil Access to Justice Clinic (Medical Legal Partnership Division) (6711)

**Multiple sections for these course numbers may be offered during a given academic year; please consult the course schedule for specific course names.

 

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in Health Law by successfully completing a minimum of 12 credits from the list of courses below, including Health Law and Policy (6410); at least one of three foundational classes, Law and Medicine (6617), Administrative Law (6400), or Insurance (6298); and two credits of experiential learning, noted with an asterisk (*).

Students must also produce a paper on a topic related to heath law that meets the standards for the law school’s upper-level writing requirement. If the paper is produced in conjunction with one of the courses below, students may use the same paper to fulfill the writing requirement for both the concentration and the JD. With advance approval of the Health Law Concentration Coordinator, a student also may use a piece written for a journal, independent legal writing, or course that is not included in the list below to meet the Health Law writing requirement.

In addition to the courses listed below, credits earned through study abroad programs also may qualify, with approval of the Health Law Concentration Coordinator.

Courses

 

 

Health Law and Policy (6410)

Law and Medicine (6617)

Food and Drug Law (6408)

Health Care Law Seminar (6411)**

Administrative Law (6400)

Insurance (6298)

Elder Law (6353)

Employee Benefit Plans (6272)

Environmental and Toxic Torts (6449)

Family Law Seminar (6352) (Assisted Reproductive Technologies)***

 

 

Genetics and the Law (6616)

Law and Psychiatry (6614)

Domestic Violence Law (6350)

Disability Rights Law (6635)

Client Interviewing and Counseling (6650)*

Health Rights Law Clinic (6631)*

Vaccine Injury Litigation Clinic (6626)*

Field Placement (6668)*

Domestic Violence Project (6674)*

**Multiple sections for these course numbers may be offered during a given academic year; please consult the course schedule for specific course names.

*** May include additional seminars with the approval of the Coordinator

Intellectual Property Law

This practice area concerns the protection of innovation, expression, competition and information. The principal survey courses are Patent Law (6471), Copyright Law (6472), Trademark and Unfair Competition Law (6474), Information Privacy Law (6486) and International Intellectual Property (6491).

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in Intellectual Property (IP) Law. Students must successfully complete a minimum of 12 credits from the courses listed below, including at least one of the following three courses:

Patent Law (6471), Copyright Law (6472) or Trademark and Unfair Competition Law (6474).

Students must receive two credits (which count toward the concentration credits) graded on the basis of an intellectual property law-related research paper that meets the standards for the law school’s legal writing requirement, either written in conjunction with one of the courses listed below in the practice area or with advance approval of the program director, a paper written for a journal or a paper for independent legal writing, on an intellectual property law topic. Up to two credits earned through an intellectual property law-related Field Placement (6668) may count toward the concentration credits, with approval of the program director.

 

Courses

 

 

Patent Law (6471)

Copyright Law (6472)

International Copyright Law (6473)

Trademark and Unfair Competition Law (6474)

Entertainment Law (6475)

Patent Strategies and Practice (6476)

The Federal Circuit (6477)

Licensing of Intellectual Property Rights (6478)

Chemical and Biotech Patent Law (6480)

Design Law (6481)

Patent Enforcement (6482)

Patent Appellate Practice (6483)

Computer Law (6484)

Law in Cyberspace (6485)

Information Privacy Law (6486)

 

 

Art, Cultural Heritage and the Law Seminar (6488)

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in the U.S. International Trade Commission (6489)

International and Comparative Patent Law (6490)

International Intellectual Property (6491)

Advanced Trademark Law (6492)

Internet Law (6493)

Intellectual Property Antitrust Seminar (6494)

USPTO Post-Grant Patent Proceedings (6495)

Intellectual Property Law Seminar (6496)**

Selected Topics in Intellectual Property Law (6497)**

Trade Secrets Law (6499)

Government Procurement of Intellectual Property Seminar (6512)

Legal Drafting (IP) (6652)

Intellectual Property and Technology Law Clinic (6709)

 

**Multiple sections for these course numbers may be offered during a given academic year; please consult the course schedule for specific course names.

Please note: Intellectual Property Law (6470) does not count toward the minimum 12 credits for the JD Concentration in Intellectual Property Law, because it is intended as a general introduction for those not intending to specialize in Intellectual Property Law.

 

 

International and Comparative Law

These courses explore the international and domestic laws that regulate or influence international activity among countries, international institutions, businesses and individuals. The four key survey courses are International Law (6520), International Business Transactions (6522), International Trade Law (6526) and Comparative Law (6532). The remaining advanced courses focus on a wide range of issues in both public and private international law and comparative law as well as the domestic law of other countries.

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in International and Comparative Law by successfully completing a minimum of 12 credits from the list of courses below, including at least two credits of experiential learning and a writing requirement. All students must take International Law (6520), one course designated as “comparative” with an asterisk (*) and two credits of experiential learning, noted below with two asterisks (**).

Students can also meet the two credits of experiential learning required for the JD concentration by pursuing Moot Court (6644) or Field Placement (6668) focused on international or comparative law. The writing requirement for the JD concentration can be met in the same manner as GW Law’s legal writing requirement. A journal note, seminar paper or independent writing assignment can count towards the JD concentration. The writing requirement must be focused on a topic related to international and comparative law. Students interested in this concentration must notify the program director during their 2L year.

Note: Students cannot obtain concentrations in both International and Comparative Law and National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law. Students cannot obtain concentrations in both International and Comparative Law and National Security and Cybersecurity Law.

Foundation Courses

 

 

International Law (6520)

International Business Transactions (6522)

 

 

International Trade Law (6526)

Comparative Law (6532)*

Advanced Courses

 

 

International Taxation (6312)

Trade and Sustainable Development (6435)

Immigration Criminal Enforcement (6367)

International Environmental Law (6454)

International Climate Change Law (6455)

International Copyright Law (6473)

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in the U.S. International Trade Commission (6489)

International and Comparative Patent Law (6490)*

International Intellectual Property (6491) Comparative Public Procurement (6508)*

Procurement in International Development (6516)

International Money Laundering, Corruption and Terrorism (6521)**

The International Competition Law Regime (6523)

Advanced International Trade Law (6527) International Litigation (6528)

International Organizations (6530)

International Family Law (6533)**

Law of the European Union (6534)*

Islamic Law (6535)*

Immigration Law I (6538)

Immigration Law II (6539)

Refugee and Asylum Law (6540)

International Banking and Investment Law (6542)

Chinese Law and Legal Institutions (6543)*

International Investment Law and Arbitration (6544)

 

 

International Project Finance (6545)

International Law of Human Rights (6546)

Regional Protection of Human Rights (6547)*

Space Law (6548)

Chinese Business Law (6549)

Law of the Sea (6550)

Law of War (6552)

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation (6553)

International Criminal Law (6554)

Comparative Constitutional Law (6555)*

International Arbitration (6556)**

Introduction to Transactional Islamic Law (6557)*

International Negotiations (6558)**

Nation Building and the Rule of Law (6559)

Public International Law Seminar (6562)

International Business Transactions Seminar (6564)

Human Trafficking Law (6572)

Conflict of Laws (6234)

Comparative Law Seminar (6565)*

Human Rights Lawyering (6568)**

International Human Rights of Women (6570)

Immigration Clinic (6630)**

Civil and Human Rights Clinic (6633)**

Dispute Resolution (6682)

U.S. Foreign Relations (6871)

**In addition to the courses listed above, credits obtained through the GW–Oxford Summer Program in International Human Rights Law and Munich Intellectual Property Law Summer Program may be counted toward the 12-credit requirement. Credits earned through other study abroad programs also may qualify, with approval of the program director.

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in International Business Law by successfully completing 12 credits in Business and Finance Law and 12 credits in International and Comparative Law, for a total of 24 credits. As part of the required 24 credits, students must complete two credits of experiential learning and a writing requirement focused on International Business Law through courses included on the Business and Finance course list below or the International and Comparative Law courses listed above.

In essence, students must satisfy the requirements of both the Business and Finance Law and the International and Comparative Law JD concentrations (e.g., students must take Corporations (6250), International Law (6520) and a course designated above as comparative with an *). Students interested in this concentration must notify the program director during their 2L year and complete an online registration form.

Labor and Employment Law

This field of law deals with all aspects of the employment relationship. The key survey courses are Labor Law, which covers the organization and representation of employees through unions, and Employment Law, which explores the rights and responsibilities of workers. Advanced courses focus on other legal rules that apply in the workplace or affect the employer/ employee relationship.

Foundation Courses

 

 

Labor Law (6266)

Employment Law (6268)

 

 

 

Advanced Courses

 

 

Employee Benefit Plans (6272)

Unincorporated Business Organizations and Agency Law (6294)

Sports and the Law (6295)

 

 

Employment Discrimination Law (6390)

Disability Rights Law (6635)

 

Litigation and the Judicial Process

Courses in this area examine the procedural and remedial rules that regulate civil and criminal litigation in our state and federal courts. Building upon the required Civil Procedure course, the key survey courses in this area are Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure, Criminal Procedure, Evidence, Federal Courts, Conflict of Laws and Remedies. Related simulation courses include Trial Advocacy, Federal Trial Practice and Moot Court.

Foundation Courses

 

 

Evidence (6230)

Federal Courts (6232)

Conflict of Laws (6234)

 

 

Remedies (6238)

Criminal Procedure (6360)

Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure (6362)

 

Advanced Courses

 

 

Complex Litigation (6236)

Electronic Discovery and Evidence (6237)

Appellate Practice (6246)

Selected Topics in Civil Procedure (6247)**

Scientific Evidence Seminar (6248)

Civil Procedure Seminar (6249)

Admiralty (6293)

Insurance (6298)

Products Liability (6354)

Role of the Federal Prosecutor (6363)

Criminal Tax Litigation (6365)

Environmental and Toxic Torts (6449)

The Federal Circuit (6477)

Comparative Constitutional Law (6555)

Nation Building and the Rule of Law (6559)

Race, Racism and American Law (6595)

Family Justice Litigation Clinic (6624)

 

 

Criminal Appeals and Post-Conviction Services (6625)

Vaccine Injury Litigation Clinic (6626)

Rising for Justice (6634)

Pre-Trial Advocacy (6643)

Advanced Appellate Advocacy (6653)

Law and Rhetoric (6654)

Judicial Lawyering (6669)

Government Lawyering (6671)

Military Justice (6873)

Comparative Military Law (6874)

Advanced Trial Advocacy (6675)*

Pre-Trial Practice in Civil Cases (6677)*

Ethics in Adjudication and Settlement (6678)*

Advanced Evidence (6679)*

The American Jury (6680)*

College of Trial Advocacy (6683)*

Pre-Trial Practice in Criminal Cases (6684)*

The following courses are open only to LLM degree candidates:

 

 

Negotiation and Conflict Management Systems Design (6681)

Arbitration (6685)

 

 

 

*These courses have limited enrollment by JD students with the written permission of the program director.

**Multiple sections for these course numbers may be offered during a given academic year; please consult the course schedule for specific course names.

 

National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law

This practice area, which has grown exponentially since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, explores the nature and origins of the federal government’s foreign relations powers, and U.S. law implementing international law and affecting national security. The field includes law on the use of armed forces and intelligence operations abroad, counterterrorism, homeland security, management of crises, immigration, nonproliferation, treatment of detainees, congressional oversight and classified information. The two foundational survey courses are National Security Law (6870) and U.S. Foreign Relations Law (6871). The remaining advanced courses pursue in greater detail issues raised in the survey courses.

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law by successfully completing (i.e., receiving a grade of C- or better) 14 credits of National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law courses (listed in the Advanced Courses below), including two required courses—National Security Law (6870) and U.S. Foreign Relations Law (6871)—and two credits graded on the basis of a research paper that meets the standards for the law school’s legal writing requirement, either written in conjunction with one of the Foundation Courses or Advanced Courses in the practice area or with advance approval of the program director, written for a journal, independent legal writing or a course that is not included in the Foundation Courses or Advanced Courses lists or on a national security and U.S. foreign relations law topic. Up to two credits earned through a national security law-related Field Placement (6668) may count toward the concentration credits, with approval of the program director.

Note: students cannot obtain concentrations in both National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law and International and Comparative Law. Students cannot obtain concentrations in both National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law and National Security and Cybersecurity Law.

 

Foundation Courses

 

 

National Security Law (6870)

U.S. Foreign Relations Law (6871)

 

 

 

 

Advanced Courses

 

 

Professional Responsibility and Ethics (National Security) (6218)

Litigation with the Federal Government (6240)

Admiralty (6293)

Immigration Criminal Enforcement (6367)

Computer Crime (6369)

Law of Separation of Powers (6384)

Legislation (6416)

Legislative Analysis and Drafting (6418)

Congressional Investigations Seminar (6420)

Veterans Law (6423)

Veterans Advocacy (6428)

Information Privacy Law (6486)

International Law (6520)

International Money Laundering, Corruption, and Terrorism (6521)

Immigration Law (6538)

Refugee and Asylum Law (6540)

International Law of Human Rights (6546)

Space Law (6548)

Law of the Sea (6550)

Law of War (6552)

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation (6553)

International Criminal Law (6554)

Nation Building and the Rule of Law (6559)

Public International Law Seminar (6562)**

Human Trafficking Law (6572)

Legal Drafting (National Security) (6652)

Field Placement (6668)

 

 

Selected Topics in National Security Law (6869)**

National Security Law Seminar (6872)**

Military Justice (6873)

Comparative Military Law (6874)

Counterterrorism Law (6875)

Homeland Security Law and Policy (6876)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Law and Policy (6877)

Intelligence Law (6878)

Cybersecurity Law and Policy (6879)

Disaster Law (6880)

Artificial Intelligence Law and Policy (6881)

Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (6882)

Counterintelligence Law and Policy (6883)

Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity (6884)

Transnational Security (6885)

Domestic Terrorism (6886)

Problems Trying Terrorists in Article III Courts (6887)

Crisis and Legal Controversy in the CIA (6888)

Aviation Law and National Security (6889)

Cybersecurity Law and Technology (6890)

Foreign Access to US Technology (6891)

Selected Topics in Cybersecurity Law (6892)**

Disinformation, National Security, and Cybersecurity: Overview and Legal Approaches (6893)

Blockchain: Law, Policy, and Cybersecurity (6894)

Global Privacy Law and Conflict Seminar (6895)

**For 2022–2023, Public International Law Seminars may include Arms Control; National Security Law Seminars may include Internal Investigations, Modern Politics, and the Office of the Inspector General; Selected Topics in National Security Law may include Guantanamo Bay Detention: Ethics, Law & Policy, Law of Secrecy, and Contemporary Armed Conflict; and Selected Topics in Cybersecurity Law may include Cybersecurity: Risk Management and Incident Response.

 

National Security and Cybersecurity Law

This practice area has evolved with the world’s increased connectivity through the use of modern technology and cyberspace and the accompanying growing vulnerabilities from physical and cyber threats. Courses in this practice area explore the use of the internet and technologies, as well as sophisticated cyber actors and nation-states and how they exploit vulnerabilities, steal information and money and develop methods to disrupt, destroy or threaten essential services. The field includes law on the use of securing the critical cyber infrastructure, cyber breaches, armed forces and intelligence operations abroad, counterterrorism, homeland security, management of crises, congressional oversight and classified information.

The foundational survey courses are National Security Law (6870), Cybersecurity Law and Policy (6879), Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity (6884) and Cybersecurity Law and Technology (6890). (Note: Students who receive credit for Law 6879, Cybersecurity Law and Policy or Law 6884, Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity may not enroll in Law 6890, Cybersecurity Law and Technology). The remaining advanced courses pursue in greater detail issues raised in the survey courses.

JD candidates may earn a JD Concentration in National Security and Cybersecurity Law by successfully completing (i.e., receiving a grade of C- or better) 14 credits of coursework in National Security and Cybersecurity Law (listed in the Advanced Courses below), including the following required courses—National Security Law (6870) and either Cybersecurity Law and Policy (6879) and Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity (6884) or Cybersecurity Law and Technology (6890)—and four cyber law credits from the Advanced Courses listed below plus two credits graded on the basis of a research paper that meets the standards for the law school’s legal writing requirement, either written in conjunction with one of the required, advanced or additional courses in the practice area or, with advance approval of the program director, written for a journal, independent legal writing or a course that is not included in the practice area lists on a national security and cybersecurity law topic. Up to two credits earned through a national security law-related Field Placement (6668) may count toward the concentration credits, with approval of the program director. (Students who have a background in information technology may submit a request to the program director to obtain a waiver from Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity (6884) enrollment).

Note: students cannot obtain concentrations in both National Security and Cybersecurity Law and International and Comparative Law. Students cannot obtain concentrations in both National Security and Cybersecurity Law and National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law.

Foundation Courses

 

 

National Security Law (6870)

Cybersecurity Law and Policy (6879)

 

 

Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity (6884)

Cybersecurity Law and Technology (6890)

Advanced Courses

 

 

Computer Crime (6396)

Constitutional Law Seminar (Cyber, Privacy and Speech) (6399)

Telecommunications Law (6414)

Public Law Seminar (Telecommunication and Technology) (6426)

Computer Law (6484)

Law in Cyberspace (6485)

Information Privacy Law (6486)

Internet Law (6493)

Space Law (6548)

 

 

Intelligence Law (6878)

Artificial Intelligence Law and Policy (6881)

Counterintelligence Law and Policy (6883)

Foreign Access to US Technology (6891)

Selected Topics in Cybersecurity Law (6892)**

Disinformation, National Security, and Cybersecurity: Overview and Legal Approaches (6893)

Blockchain: Law, Policy, and Cybersecurity (6894)

Global Policy Law and Conflict Seminar (6895)

Additional Courses

 

 

Professional Responsibility and Ethics (National Security) (6218)

Immigration Criminal Enforcement (6367)

Law of Separation of Powers (6384)

Legislation (6416)

Legislative Analysis and Drafting (6418)

Congressional Investigations Seminar (6420)

International Law (6520)

International Money Laundering, Corruption, and Terrorism (6521)

Immigration Law I (6538)

Refugee and Asylum Law (6540)

International Law of Human Rights (6546)

Law of the Sea (6550)

Law of War (6552)

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation (6553)

International Criminal Law (6554)

Nation Building and the Rule of the Law (6559)

Selected Topics in Public International Law (6561)**

Public International Law Seminar (6562)**

Human Trafficking Law (6572)

Legal Drafting (National Security) (6652)

Field Placement (6668)

 

 

Selected Topics in National Security Law (6869)**

U.S. Foreign Relations Law (6871)

National Security Law Seminar (6872)**

Military Justice (6873)

Comparative Military Justice (6874)

Counterterrorism Law (6875)

Homeland Security Law and Policy (6876)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Law and Policy (6877)

Disaster Law (6880)

Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (6882)

Transnational Security (6885)

Domestic Terrorism (6886)

Problems Trying Terrorists in Article III Courts (6887)

Crisis and Legal Controversy in the Central Intelligence Agency (6888)

Aviation Law and National Security (6889)

      

**For 2022–2023, Public International Law Seminars may include Arms Control; National Security Law Seminars may include Internal Investigations, Modern Politics, and the Office of the Inspector General; Selected Topics in National Security Law may include Guantanamo Bay Detention: Ethics, Law & Policy, Law of Secrecy, and Contemporary Armed Conflict; and Selected Topics in Cybersecurity Law may include Cybersecurity: Risk Management and Incident Response.

Property and Land Development

Building upon the required course Property, this practice area concerns the process of developing real estate for residential and commercial use. The key survey course is Modern Real Estate Transactions, with subsequent courses addressing the administrative, governmental and tax issues attending the real estate industry.

Foundation Course

 

 

Modern Real Estate Transactions (6330)

 

 

 

Advanced Courses
 

 

Unincorporated Business Organizations and Agency Law (6294)

Partnership and LLC Taxation (6304)

Law of Real Estate Financing (6334)

 

 

Housing Law and Policy (6338)

Property and Real Estate Law Seminar (6340)**

**Multiple sections for these course numbers may be offered during a given academic year; please consult the course schedule for specific course names.

Taxation

Federal Income Taxation examines the fundamental rules controlling the taxation of individuals and serves as the gateway course to all of the other subjects in this practice area. The remaining courses explore the taxation of other entities, such as the taxation of corporations and partnerships, the taxation of wealth transfers and the tax rules applicable to particular transactions or industries.

Foundation Classes

 

 

Federal Income Taxation (6300)

Corporate Taxation (6302)

 

 

 

Advanced Courses

 

 

Employee Benefit Plans (6272)

Business Planning (6296)

Partnership and LLC Taxation (6304)

International Taxation (6312)

Nonprofit Organizations: Law and Taxation (6314)

 

 

State and Local Taxation Law and Policy (6316)

Tax Policy Seminar (6318)

Criminal Tax Litigation (6365)

Law and Accounting (6602)