Master of Laws (LLM) Degree

Master of Laws candidates may follow a program of general study, which may be individually adapted, or they may concentrate in one of the specialized fields listed below. Graduates who complete their work in one of these specialized areas may have the field of specialization noted on their diplomas.


Entrance Requirements

For applicants with a U.S. law degree, a Juris Doctor or equivalent degree is required from a law school that is a member of the Association of American Law Schools or is approved by the American Bar Association. The applicant should have demonstrated a high degree of academic excellence in earning the first law degree.

Non-U.S. law school graduates must have completed a law degree with high academic standing from a recognized university. Non-U.S. law school graduates also may need to meet the minimum language test requirement (see below).

Advanced standing is not granted for credit earned while a candidate for the first law degree or for credit earned at any time before the student was a degree candidate in the LLM program at the law school. An exception may be made in the case of students who earn credit through the GW–Oxford Summer Program in International Human Rights Law and who subsequently matriculate in the degree program in International and Comparative Law.


Admissions Process

Application forms are available from and should be returned to the Graduate and International Programs Office, The George Washington University Law School, Washington, DC 20052.

U.S. Law School Graduates

U.S. law school graduates are admitted for both the fall and spring semesters.

Application deadlines: March 15 (for priority consideration) and June 1 (for space available consideration) for the fall semester; November 1 for the spring semester. 

Non-U.S. Law School Graduates

Non-U.S. law school graduates are admitted for both the fall and spring semesters.

Application deadlines: March 15 (for priority consideration) and June 1 (for space available consideration) for the fall semester; November 1 for the spring semester.

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and International English Language Testing System (IELTS)

To be considered for admission, students whose first law degree was earned from a non-U.S. law school in which English is not the primary language of instruction are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language and attain a score in the 600-point range (paper-based) or 100-point range (Internet-based). Scores should be sent to the law school’s Graduate and International Programs Office. Students also may be considered for admission with a score of 7.0 or above from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). TOEFL or IELTS scores may not be more than two years old. To make arrangements for the test, visit the TOEFL or IELTS testing websites.

Admission of University of Augsburg, University of Groningen, and Universitá Commerciale “Luigi Bocconi” Exchange Students

Students who have attended GW through a GW exchange program from the University of Augsburg, University of Groningen, and Universitá Commerciale “Luigi Bocconi” may apply for admission to a graduate program as a candidate for the Master of Laws degree; however, admission is not guaranteed. Candidates who seek admission for the semester directly following their exchange semester at GW must submit their application to the Graduate and International Programs Office, no later than November 1. All other candidates from Augsburg, Groningen or Bocconi should follow the general LLM application procedures for non-U.S. law school graduates. Exchange students who are granted admission to an LLM program may have the credits previously earned at the law school applied toward degree requirements. Upon completion of the LLM degree requirements, the awarding of the LLM degree to an exchange student will be held in abeyance pending their receipt of a law degree from the home institution.

Non-Degree Students

A limited number of college graduates may be admitted in non-degree status to take up to 6 hours of credit. Applicants should contact the Graduate and International Programs Office for application materials and instructions. Entrance requirements for non-degree students are the same as those for degree candidates (See section above). Non-degree students who subsequently apply for and are granted admission to one of the graduate programs as a degree candidate may have the credits earned at the law school applied toward degree requirements; however, admission as a degree candidate is not guaranteed. Enrollment in individual courses as a non-degree student will depend on space availability.

Degree Requirements

U.S. Law School Graduates

To earn the Master of Laws degree, U.S. law school graduates must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. completion of 24 credit hours, including the required curriculum and written work in the specialized programs (see Written Work Requirement and Curriculum, below);
  2. attendance for an enrollment period of a minimum of two consecutive semesters; and
  3. achievement of a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.67 at the time all requirements are met.

U.S. students who are full-time (those enrolled in 9 or more credit hours per semester) are expected to complete all degree requirements within one calendar year of matriculation; those who are part-time (enrolled in 8 or fewer credit hours per semester) are expected to complete all degree requirements within two calendar years of matriculation. Determination of the applicable time limit will be made on the basis of the number of credit hours for which the student enrolls in the first semester of their degree program. Students may be granted extensions of these time limits under appropriate circumstances. The law school may exclude a student from further study once the student’s degree requirements are satisfied. Graduate students may be excluded or put on probation for low scholarship or for violation of the law school or University Codes. For example, a student who fails or receives a grade of No Credit (NC) may be excluded from further study and may not graduate unless the student petitions for and receives the permission of the Academic Scholarship Committee. The procedure for reinstatement is as described in the respective sections of the Bulletin for Juris Doctor degree students.

Non-U.S. Law School Graduates

To earn the Master of Laws degree, all non-U.S. law school graduates must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. completion of 24 credit hours, including the required curriculum in the specialized programs (see Written Work Requirement and Curriculum, below);
  2. attendance for an enrollment period of a minimum of two consecutive semesters;
  3. completion of Legal Research and Writing for International LLM Students I (6692) and Fundamental Issues in U.S. Law (6694); and
  4. achievement of a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.00 at the time all requirements are met (2.67 for non-U.S. law school graduates who previously earned an LLM from a U.S. law school); a thesis is not required, although students may complete a thesis in connection with the degree.

Non-U.S. law school graduates are expected to complete all degree requirements in one academic year. An extension for one semester may be granted by the program director in exceptional circumstances. The law school may exclude a student from further study once the student’s degree requirements are satisfied. Graduate students may be excluded or put on probation for low scholarship or for violation of the law school or University Codes; the procedure for reinstatement is as described in the respective sections of the Bulletin for Juris Doctor degree students.

Written Work Requirement

The written work requirement may be satisfied by completion of research paper(s) or a thesis. The written work requirement for each LLM program is set forth below.

Any research paper used to fulfill the written work requirement must be at least 8,000 words in length (approximately 30 pages), including footnotes, and must conform to the legal citation rules recognized and adopted by the law school. All drafts and the final paper must conform to legal citation rules and all rules outlined in the law school publication Citing Responsibly. Failure to adhere to such rules may result in a violation of the Academic Integrity Code.

U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+ on the paper. Students should inform professors of their intention to use their research papers in a given course to satisfy the written work requirement.

The thesis is expected to be a scholarly paper of the same quality and length as a law review article. Full-time students who elect to write a thesis must enroll in Thesis (6690 and 6691) during the first and second semesters of their program; part-time students, during their third and fourth semesters.

Theses must be submitted to the University through Proquest/UMI as electronic documents; see Electronic Theses and Dissertations Submission at GW.

 

With the approval of the program director or thesis adviser, an extension of up to one calendar year may be granted for completion of the thesis; continuous enrollment must be maintained during the period of the extension. Those who, due to extraordinary circumstances, require an extension beyond one calendar year must receive approval from the program director and thesis adviser; continuous enrollment must be maintained.

Curriculum

All candidates for the LLM degree must complete a total of 24 credit hours, including course work that satisfies the written work requirement (see above). Those working toward a specialized degree must complete the minimum required number of hours in courses listed below for that program. Related courses are recommended for the remaining coursework. Specialized degree candidates must have their programs of study approved by the program director. Re-enrollment in a course previously taken as a JD student generally will not count towards the 24-credit hour requirement for the LLM degree.

Three Semester LLM Degree Option for International Students

International LLM students have the option to complete their LLM degree in three semesters. Under this three-semester option, students begin their studies during the summer, fall, and/or spring sessions. During their first semester, students are required to pursue courses focused on the following:

  1. English Legal Drafting, Research, and Structure (6689);
  2. Legal Research and Writing (6692); and
  3. Fundamental Issues in U.S. Law (6694).

Students pursuing the three-semester degree option may choose to pursue one of our LLM programs listed below. This means that students will have to complete the degree requirements for the LLM program selected.

General LLM Program

General LLM

The General LLM program allows the student to design their own course of study in order to examine a range of issues in U.S. law. Students working toward the General LLM should consult with the senior associate dean for academic affairs, associate dean for academic affairs, or their designated program adviser in order to design a comprehensive program of study tailored to meet the student’s specific needs. Students may wish to concentrate their studies in one or more areas, such as constitutional law, criminal law, labor law, corporate law, or health care law, but may select courses from all areas of the curriculum. Twenty-four credits are required for the degree. While Thesis (6690–91) is recommended; if the thesis is waived, two credits graded on the basis of a research paper can fulfill the written work requirement. Any research paper used to satisfy the written work requirement must be at least 8,000 words in length, and U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+.

Business and Finance Law Program

Director: D. Mitchell; Faculty AdvisersM. Abramowicz, J. Bearer-Friend, K. Brown, S. Charnovitz, D. Clarke, T. Gabaldon, M. Galston, S. Jones, S. Kieff,W. Kovacic, J. Manns

LLM in Business and Finance

A minimum of 16 credit hours from the following courses, including 2 credits graded on the basis of a research paper, are required. For non-U.S. law school graduates, the curriculum requirement must include Corporations (6250) unless they have previously completed equivalent course work. For both U.S. and non-U.S. law school graduates Corporations may be counted toward the Business and Finance Law credit requirement. Attendance at Business and Finance Law Program speaker events is also encouraged.

The research paper used to satisfy the written work requirement must be at least 8,000 words in length, and U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+. For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis (6690–91) and a minimum of 12 credits in the field of study are required.

Business and Finance Course Listing:

 

 

Securities Regulation (6252)

Corporate Finance (6254)

Mergers and Acquisitions (6256)

Regulation of Mutual Funds and Investment Advisers (6260)

Regulation of Derivatives (6261)

Corporation Law Seminar (6262)

Selected Topics in Corporate Law (6263)

Securities Law Seminar (6264)

Selected Topics in Securities Law (6267)

Employee Benefit Plans (6272)

Secured Transactions (6280)

Commercial Paper—Payment Systems (6282)

Creditors’ Rights and Debtors’ Protection (6284)

Business Bankruptcy and Reorganization (6285)

Consumer Protection Law (6286)

Selected Topics in Banking Law (6289)

Banking Law (6290)

Admiralty (6293)

Unincorporated Business Organizations and Agency Law (6294)

Sports and the Law (6295)

Business Planning (6296)

Insurance (6298)

Federal Income Taxation (6300)

Corporate Taxation (6302)

Partnership and LLC Taxation (6304)

International Taxation (6312)

Nonprofit Organizations: Law and Taxation (6314)

State and Local Taxation (6316)

Selected Topics in Tax Policy Law (6317)

Tax Policy Seminar (6318)

Modern Real Estate Transactions (6330)

Land Use Law (6332)

Law of Real Estate Financing (6334)

Reading Group (6351)*

White Collar Crime (6364)

Antitrust Law (6402)

 

 

Advanced Antitrust Law Seminar (6403)

Selected Topics in Advanced Antitrust Law (6405)

Regulated Industries (6406) Public Law Seminar (6426)*

Selected Topics in Public Law (6427)* 

Trade and Sustainable Development (6435)

Energy Law Seminar (6441)*

Environmental Issues in Business Transactions (6452)

Entertainment Law (6475)

Anti-Corruption and Compliance (6511)

International Money Laundering, Corruption, and Terrorism (6521)

International Business Transactions (6522)

International Commercial Law (6524)

International Trade Law (6526)

Advanced International Trade Law (6527)

Law of the European Union (6534)

International Finance (6541)

International Banking and Investment Law (6542)

International Investment Law and Arbitration (6544)

International Project Finance (6545)

Chinese Business Law (6549)

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation (6553)

International Arbitration (6556)

Introduction to Transactional Islamic Law (6557)

International Negotiations (6558)

International Business Transaction Seminar (6564)

Law and Economics (6598)

Law and Accounting (6602)

Small Business and Community Economic Development Clinic (6621)

Negotiations (6648)*

Legal Drafting (Transactional) (6652)

Legal Drafting (Mergers and Acquisitions) (6652)

Field Placement (6668)*

Graduate Independent Legal Writing (6696)*

Graduate Clinical Studies (6697)*

*Select sections with the permission of the program director.

Please note: The courses below are related to, but do not count toward the 16-credit Business and Finance curriculum requirement.

Courses Related to Business and Finance Law

 

 

Administrative Law (6400)

Legislation (6416)

Legislative Analysis and Drafting (6418)

Local Government Law (6422)

Environmental Law (6430)

Patent Law (6471)

 

 

Copyright Law (6472)

Formation of Government Contracts (6502)

Performance of Government Contracts (6503)

International Organizations (6530)

Space Law (6548) Law of the Sea (6550)

International Dispute Resolution (6682)

Environmental and Energy Law Program

Director: R. Abate; Faculty Advisers: R. Glicksman, E. Hammond, R. Pierce; Assistant Dean for Energy Law D. Attanasio

Programs of study are offered in Environmental Law and in three specialized fields—Energy and Environmental Law, Government Procurement and Environmental Law, and International Environmental Law. Course requirements for each field are provided below:

LLM in Environmental Law

A minimum of 16 credit hours from the following courses is required.*
For U.S. law school graduates, this requirement must include completion of Air Pollution Control (6432), Water Pollution Control (6434), and Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA) (6442). U.S. law school graduates may not enroll in Environmental Law (6430).

For U.S. law school graduates this requirement must include 4 credits graded on the basis of a research paper or research papers. This typically entails completion of Thesis (6690–91) or two research papers, each of which is written in connection with a 2-credit course.

For non-U.S. law school graduates, this curriculum requirement must include completion of one of the following courses: Law 6432, 6434, or 6442. Non-U.S. law school graduates may enroll in Environmental Law (6430) unless the student has previously completed a survey course in U.S. Environmental Law. Non-U.S. law school graduates also must complete one research paper, as part of a 2-credit course graded on the basis of a research paper, or complete Thesis (6690–91).

Any research paper used to satisfy the written work requirement must be at least 8,000 words in length, and U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+. Graduates from non-U.S. law schools must achieve a passing grade for their research papers. For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis (6690–91) and a minimum of 12 credits in the field of study are required. Students are encouraged to write a thesis.

Courses

 

 

Land Use Law (6332)

Regulated Industries (6406)

Animal Law Seminar (6424)

Environmental Law (6430)

Wildlife and Ecosystems Law (6431)

Air Pollution Control (6432)

Water Pollution Control (6434)

Trade and Sustainable Development (6435)

Coastal, Navigation, and Wetlands Resource Law (6437)

Energy Law and Regulation (6438)

Natural Resources Law (6440)

Energy Law Seminar (6441)**

Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA) (6442)

Oil and Gas Law (6443)

Regulation of Toxic Substances Risk (6444)

Energy Commodities, Climate Change, & Derivatives (6447)

Environmental and Toxic Torts (6449)

Federal Facilities Environmental Law Issues (6450)

 

 

Selected Topics in Energy Law (6451)**

Environmental Issues in Business Transactions (6452)

International Environmental Law (6454)

International Climate Change Law (6455)

Sustainable Communities Law and Policy Seminar (6457)

Environmental Negotiations (6458)

Atomic Energy Law (6459)

Selected Topics in Environmental Law (6461)**

Environmental Crimes (6464)

Environmental Law Seminar (6466)**

Graduate Environmental Placement (6468)

Environmental Lawyering (6469)

International Trade Law (6526)

Advanced International Trade Law (6527)

International Project Finance Law (6545)

Graduate Independent Legal Writing (6696) 
(Environmental Law topic)

*Torts (6206) and Property (6208) also will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count these courses toward the 16 credits required in the field.

**Students should consult the Supplement to the Bulletin for information on the available seminars and selected topic courses for each semester. For guidance on which seminars and selected topic courses meet the LLM requirements, students should consult with their program director.

LLM in Energy and Environmental Law

A minimum of 16 credit hours from the following courses is required,* including completion of:

  1. one of the following courses: Energy Law and Regulation (6438), Oil and Gas Law (6443) or Atomic Energy Law (6459);
  2. one of the following courses: Environmental Law (6430) unless the student has previously completed a survey course in U.S. environmental law, Air Pollution Control (6432), Water Pollution Control (6434), or Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA) (6442); and
  3. the written work requirement.

For the written work requirement, U.S. law school graduates are required to complete 4 credits graded on the basis of a Thesis (6690–91) or two research papers, each of which is written in connection with a 2-credit course.

For the written work requirement, non-U.S. law school graduates are required to complete at least 2 credits graded on the basis of a single research paper or Thesis (6690–91). Any research paper used to satisfy the written work requirement must be at least 8,000 words in length. U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+, and graduates from non-U.S. law schools must achieve a passing grade for their research paper. Students are encouraged to write a thesis.

Courses

 

 

Regulated Industries (6406)

Environmental Law (6430)

Wildlife and Ecosystems Law (6431)

Air Pollution Control (6432)

Water Pollution Control (6434)

Coastal, Navigation, and Wetlands Resource Law (6437)

Energy Law and Regulation (6438)

Natural Resources Law (6440)

Energy Law Seminar (6441)**

Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA) (6442)

 

 

Oil and Gas Law (6443)

Federal Facilities Environmental Law Issues (6450)

Selected Topics in Energy Law (6451)**

International Climate Change Law (6455)

Environmental Negotiations (6458)

Atomic Energy Law (6459)

Selected Topics in Environmental Law (6461)**

International Project Finance (6545)

Graduate Independent Legal Writing (6696)
(Energy Law topic)

*Property (6208) also will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count this course toward the 16 credits required in the field.

** Students should consult the Supplement to the Bulletin for information on the available seminars and selected topic courses for each semester. For guidance on which seminars and selected topic courses meet the LLM requirements, students should consult with their program director.

LLM in Government Procurement and Environmental Law

A minimum of 16 credit hours from the following courses is required.

For U.S. law graduates this degree requires:

  1. the one-credit Government Contracts Overview (6518) course taken in their first semester;
  2. a minimum of five additional credits of Government Procurement Law including at least two of the following: Formation of Government Contracts (6502), Performance of Government Contracts (6503), and Government Contracts Cost and Pricing (6506);
  3. a minimum of six credits of Environmental Law or Energy Law courses including at least three of the following: Air Pollution Control (6432), Water Pollution Control (6434), Energy Law & Regulation (6438) and Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA) (6442); and
  4. completion of the written work requirement (4 credits).

For non-U.S. law graduates this degree requires:

  1. the one-credit Government Contracts Overview (6518) course taken in their first semester;
  2. a minimum of five additional credits of Government Procurement Law including at least two of the following: Formation of Government Contracts (6502), Performance of Government Contracts (6503), and Government Contracts Cost and Pricing (6506);
  3. a minimum of six credits of Environmental Law or Energy Law courses, including at least two of the following: Environmental Law (6430) unless the student has previously completed a survey course in U.S. environmental law; Air Pollution Control (6432); Water Pollution Control (6434); or Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA) (6442); and
  4. completion of a minimum of 2 credits as the written work requirement.

All students must complete a written work requirement. Any research paper intended to satisfy the written work requirement must be at least 8,000 words in length.

All students are strongly encouraged to take both Formation of Government Contracts (6502) and Performance of Government Contracts (6503). U.S. law school graduates are also encouraged to take Government Contracts Cost and Pricing (6506).

For U.S. law school graduates, the written work requirement must include 4 credits graded on the basis of a research paper or research papers. This requires completion of Thesis (6690 or 6691) or two research papers, each of which is written in connection with a separate 2-credit course. U.S. law school graduates are encouraged to write a thesis. For those U.S. law graduates who opt for research papers in lieu of a thesis, one paper must be on a combined Environmental and Government Procurement topic; for the other paper, which must be on a different issue of law, students may focus on another combined topic or, with the approval of the Program Directors, may choose a topic focused solely on environmental law or government procurement law. U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+ for each research paper.

Non-U.S. law school graduates may satisfy the written work requirement by completing 2 credits graded on the basis of a single research paper or a 4-credit Thesis (6690 or 6691). For Non-U.S. law school students who opt for a research paper in lieu of a thesis, the paper must be on a combined Environmental and Government Procurement topic, or with the approval of the Program Directors, on a topic focused solely on environmental law or government procurement law. Non-U.S. law school graduates must achieve a passing grade for their research paper.

The following courses may be credited toward completion of the 16-credit requirement in cases in which the required courses specified above do not fulfill the 16-credit minimum. The courses marked (RP) require a research paper. No other courses count toward completion of the 16-credit requirement absent written approval of the Program Directors.

 

 

Environmental Law Electives

Air Pollution Control (6432)

Water Pollution Control (6434)

Trade and Sustainable Development (6435) (RP)

Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA) (6442)

Environmental Impact Statement (6445)

Environmental and Toxic Torts (6449) (RP)

International Climate Change Law (6455)

 

 

Government Procurement Electives

Formation of Government Contracts (6502)

Performance of Government Contracts (6503)

Government Contracts Cost and Pricing (6506)

Comparative Public Procurement (6508) (RP)

Government Contracts Seminar (6509) (RP)

Procurement in International Development (6516) (RP)

Other

Graduate Independent Legal Writing (6696)
(Procurement and Environmental Law topic)

LLM in International Environmental Law

A minimum of 16 credit hours from the following courses is required,* including completion of:

  1. Environmental Law (6430) unless the student has previously completed a survey course in U.S. environmental law;
  2. one of the following three courses: Air Pollution Control (6432), Water Pollution Control (6434), or Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA) (6442);
  3. either International Business Transactions (6522) or International Organizations (6530); and
  4. the written work requirement.

For the written work requirement, U.S. law school graduates are required to complete 4 credits graded on the basis of Thesis (6690–91) or two research papers, each of which is written in connection with a separate 2-credit course.

For the written work requirement, non-U.S. law school graduates are required to complete at least 2 credits graded on the basis of a single research paper or Thesis (6690–91). Any research paper must be at least 8,000 words in length.

U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+ and graduates from non-U.S. law schools must achieve a passing grade for their research paper. Students are encouraged to write a thesis.

Courses

Environmental Law (6430) Air Pollution Control (6432)

Water Pollution Control (6434)

Trade and Sustainable Development (6435)

Control of Solid and Hazardous Wastes (RCRA & CERCLA) (6442)

International Environmental Law (6454) International Climate Change Law (6455)

Selected Topics in Environmental Law (6461)†

Environmental Law Seminar (6466)† 

International Law (6520)

International Trade Law (6526)

Advanced International Trade Law (6527)

International Business Transactions (6522)

or International Organizations (6530)

Law of the Sea (6550)

Graduate Independent Legal Writing (6696)
(International Environmental Law topic)

*Torts (6206) and Property (6208) also will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count these courses toward the 16 credits required in the field.

Approval of program director required. The seminar or selected Topics must be related to international environmental law.

Government Procurement Law Program

Director: J. Tillipman; Faculty Advisers: S. Schooner, J. Schwartz, C. Yukins

LLM in Government Procurement Law

Students must enroll in the following required government procurement classes:

Government Contracts Overview (6518) (to be taken in the first semester), Formation of Government Contracts (6502), Performance of Government Contracts (6503), and Government Contracts Cost and Pricing (6506) (non-U.S. Law students are not required to take Government Contracts Cost and Pricing (6506)).

Students must also complete a 4-credit written work requirement, which entails the completion of a thesis or two research papers written in connection with two separate 2-credit courses.

For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis I (6690), Thesis II (6691), and a minimum of 10 credits from the following government procurement courses are required.

For students who choose to complete two research papers, a minimum of 14 credits, including the two separate 2-credit courses, from the following government procurement courses are required. Any research paper used to satisfy the written work requirement must be at least 8,000 words in length, and U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+.

No more than 10 credits may be taken from the following, non-exhaustive list of “Courses Related to Government Procurement Law.”

Courses

Formation of Government Contracts (6502)

Performance of Government Contracts (6503)

Government Contracts Advocacy (6505)

Government Contracts Cost and Pricing (6506)

Comparative Public Procurement (6508)

Government Contracts Seminar (6509)**

Graduate Government Contracts Placement (6510)

Anti-Corruption and Compliance (6511)

Government Procurement of Intellectual Property Seminar (6512)

Selected Topics in Government Procurement (6513)***

Federal Grants Law (6514)

Government Contracts Moot Court (6515)

Procurement in International Development (6516)

Government Contracts Overview (6518)

*Contracts (6202) will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count these courses toward the 14 credits required in the field.

**For 2022–2023, Government Contracts Seminars may include Foreign Government Contracting, State and Local Procurement, Sustainable Procurement, and Procurement Reform.

***For 2022–2023, Selected Topics in Government Procurement may include Suspension and Debarment in Government Procurement, Other Transactions, Introduction to Federal Appropriations Law, Acquisition Policymaking, and Negotiations in Government Procurement.

Courses Related to Government Procurement Law

Federal Courts (6232)

Mergers and Acquisitions (6256) Labor Law (6266)

Business Planning (6296)

Corporate Taxation (6302)

Reading Group (Block Chain Law and Tech) (6351)

Employment Discrimination Law (6390)

Administrative Law (6400)

Antitrust Law (6402)

Health Law and Policy (6410) Legislation (6416)

Legislative Analysis and Drafting (6418)

Local Government Law (6422)

Public Law Seminar (6426) Environmental Law (6430)

Patent Law (6471)

International Money Laundering, Corruption, and Terrorism (6521)

International Business Transactions (6522)

International Commercial Law (6524)

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulations (6553)

Human Rights Lawyering (6568)

Law and Accounting (6602) Trial Advocacy (6640)

Government Lawyering (6671)

Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution (6676)

Negotiation and Conflict Management Systems Design (6681)

Cybersecurity Law and Policy (6879)

Disaster Law (6880)

Artificial Intelligence Law and Policy (6881)

Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity (6884)

Cybersecurity Law and Technology (6890)

Foreign Access to U.S. Technology (6891)

Intellectual Property Law Program

Director: J. Whealan; Faculty Director: R. Brauneis; Advisers: M. Abramowicz,D. Karshtedt, S. Kieff, D. Nunziato

LLM in Intellectual Property Law

A minimum of 14 credits from the following courses is required,* including 2 credits graded on the basis of research paper. The research paper must be at least 8,000 words in length, and U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+.

For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis (6690–91) and a minimum of 10 credits from the following courses are required.

Courses

 

 

Patent Law (6471)

Copyright Law (6472)

International Copyright Law (6473)

Trademark Law and Unfair Competition (6474)

Entertainment Law (6475)

Patent Strategies and Practice (6476)

The Federal Circuit (6477)

Licensing of Intellectual Property Rights (6478)

Chemical and Biotech Patent Law (6480)

Design Law (6481)

Patent Enforcement (6482)

Patent Appellate Practice (6483)

Computer Law (6484)

Law in Cyberspace (6485)

Information Privacy Law (6486)

 

 

Art, Cultural Heritage, and the Law Seminar (6488)

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in the U.S. International Trade Commission (6489)

International and Comparative Patent Law (6490)

International Intellectual Property (6491)

Advanced Trademark Law (6492)

Internet Law (6493)

Intellectual Property Antitrust Seminar (6494)

USPTO Post-Grant Patent Proceedings (6495)

Intellectual Property Law Seminar (6496)**

Selected Topics in Intellectual Property Law (6497)**

Trade Secrets Law (6499)

Government Procurement of Intellectual Property Seminar (6512)

Legal Drafting (IP) (6652)

Intellectual Property and Technology Law Clinic (6709)

*Property (6208) also will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count this course toward the 14 credits required in the field.

**Multiple sections for these course numbers may be offered during a given academic year; please consult the course schedule for specific course names.

Please note: Although IP students might also be interested in taking the below courses, they do not count towards the required 14-credit requirement.

Courses Related to Intellectual Property Law

 

 

Sports and the Law (6295)

Antitrust Law (6402)

Telecommunications Law (6414)

Intellectual Property Law (6470)

 

 

Formation of Government Contracts (6502)

Genetics and the Law (6616)

Law and Medicine (6617)

International and Comparative Law Program

Director: R. Celorio; Faculty Advisers: P. S. Berman, F. Bignami, K. Brown, S. Charnovitz, D. Clarke, L. Dickinson, D. Fontana, S. Murphy, R. Steinhardt, E. Swaine

LLM in International and Comparative Law (Regular Track)

A minimum of 12 credits from the following courses is required,* including 2 credits graded on the basis of research paper. The research paper must be at least 8,000 words in length, and U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+.

For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis (6690–91) and a minimum of 12 credits from the following courses are required.

International and Comparative Law Course List

Conflict of Laws (6234)

International Taxation (6312)

Immigration Criminal Enforcement (6367)

Trade and Sustainable Development (6435)

International Environmental Law (6454)

International Climate Change Law (6455)

International Copyright Law (6473)

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in the U.S. International Trade Commission (6489)

International and Comparative Patent Law (6490)

International Intellectual Property (6491)

Comparative Public Procurement (6508)

Procurement in International Development (6516)

International Law (6520)

International Money Laundering, Corruption, and Terrorism (6521)

International Business Transactions (6522)

International Commercial Law (6524)

International Trade Law (6526)

Advanced International Trade Law (6527)

International Litigation (6528)

International Organizations (6530)

Comparative Law (6532)

International Family Law (6533)

Law of the European Union (6534)

Islamic Law (6535)

Immigration Law I (6538)

Immigration Law II (6539)

Refugee and Asylum Law (6540)

International Finance (6541)

International Banking and Investment Law (6542)

Chinese Law and Legal Institutions (6543)

International Investment Law and Arbitration (6544)

International Project Finance (6545)

International Law of Human Rights (6546)

Regional Protection of Human Rights (6547)

Space Law (6548)

Chinese Business Law (6549)

Law of the Sea (6550)

Law of War (6552)

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation (6553)

International Criminal Law (6554)

Comparative Constitutional Law (6555)

International Arbitration (6556)

Introduction to Transactional Islamic Law (6557)

International Negotiations (6558)

Nation Building and the Rule of Law (6559)

Public International Law Seminar (6562)

International Business Transactions Seminar (6564)

Comparative Law Seminar (6565)

Human Rights Lawyering (6568)

International Human Rights of Women (6570)

Immigration Clinic (6630)

Civil and Human Rights Clinic (6633)

Field Placement (6668)**

Graduate Clinical Studies (6697)**

International Dispute Resolution (6682)

U.S. Foreign Relations Law (6871)

Human Trafficking Law (6572)

**With the permission of the program director.

LLM in International and Comparative Law (Practical Track)

A minimum of 12 credits from the courses listed below is required, including 2 credits graded on the basis of a research paper and a program-qualifying externship. The research paper must be at least 8,000 words in length, and U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+.

For students who choose to write a thesis, Thesis (6690) and a minimum of 12 credits from the courses listed below are required.

International and Comparative Law Course List

Conflict of Laws (6234)

International Taxation (6312)

Immigration Criminal Enforcement (6367)

Trade and Sustainable Development (6435)

International Environmental Law (6454)

International Climate Change Law (6455)

International Copyright Law (6473)

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in the U.S. International Trade Commission (6489)

International and Comparative Patent Law (6490)

International Intellectual Property (6491)

Comparative Public Procurement (6508)

Procurement in International Development (6516)

International Law (6520)

International Money Laundering, Corruption, and Terrorism (6521)

International Business Transactions (6522)

International Commercial Law (6524)

International Trade Law (6526)

Advanced International Trade Law (6527)

International Litigation (6528)

International Organizations (6530)

Comparative Law (6532)

International Family Law (6533)

Law of the European Union (6534)

Islamic Law (6535)

Immigration Law I (6538)

Immigration Law II (6539)

Refugee and Asylum Law (6540)

International Finance (6541)

International Banking and Investment Law (6542)

Chinese Law and Legal Institutions (6543)

International Investment Law and Arbitration (6544)

International Project Finance (6545)

International Law of Human Rights (6546)

Regional Protection of Human Rights (6547)

Space Law (6548)

Chinese Business Law (6549)

Law of the Sea (6550)

Law of War (6552)

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation (6553)

International Criminal Law (6554)

Comparative Constitutional Law (6555)

International Arbitration (6556)

Introduction to Transactional Islamic Law (6557)

International Negotiations (6558)

Nation Building and the Rule of Law (6559)

Public International Law Seminar (6562)

International Business Transactions Seminar (6564)

Comparative Law Seminar (6565)

Human Rights Lawyering (6568)

International Human Rights of Women (6570)

Immigration Clinic (6630)

Civil and Human Rights Clinic (6633)

Field Placement (6668)**

Graduate Clinical Studies (6697)**

International Dispute Resolution (6682)

U.S. Foreign Relations Law (6871)

Human Trafficking Law (6572)

**With the permission of the program director.
Concentration in International Human Rights

LLM students wishing to pursue a concentration in International Human Rights must select International and Comparative Law as their designated specialty during their LLM studies. A student must also complete 10 credits specifically in this area of study. A list of eligible courses has been included below. These credits should be a part of (and not in addition to) the credits required to complete the LLM program in International and Comparative Legal Studies.

Within these ten credits, two credits of experiential learning are required, which can be obtained by pursuing related experiential courses, Field Placement (6668), Moot Court (6644), Graduate Clinical Studies (6697) or Human Rights Lawyering (6568).

Students also need to complete a writing requirement on a topic related to international human rights. A journal note, seminar paper, thesis, or independent writing assignment can count towards the concentration.

Students interested in this concentration must notify the program director during the first semester of their LLM degree and complete an online registration form.

Courses

Conflict of Laws (6234)

Immigration Law I (6538)

Immigration Law II (6539)

Refugee and Asylum Law (6540)

International Law of Human Rights (6546)

Regional Protection of Human Rights (6547)

Nation Building and Rule of Law (6559)

Public International Law Seminar (6562)

Selected Topics in Public International Law (6561)

Human Rights Lawyering (6568)

International Human Rights of Women (6570)

Human Rights and Environmental Protection (6571)

Individual and Group Rights (6580)

Immigration Clinic (6630)

Human Trafficking Law (6572)

Constitutional Law II (6380)

International Women's Rights Lawyering Practicum (6574)**

Courses part of GW–Oxford Summer Program in International Human Rights Law
Concentration in International Arbitration, Mediation and Other Forms of Dispute Resolution

LLM students wishing to pursue a concentration in International Arbitration, Mediation, and Other Forms of Dispute Resolution must select International and Comparative Law as their designated specialty during their LLM studies. A student must complete 10 credits specifically in this area of study. A list of eligible courses has been included below. These credits should be a part of (and not in addition to) the credits required to complete the LLM program in International and Comparative Legal Studies.

Within these ten credits, two credits of experiential learning are required, which can be obtained pursuing related experiential courses, Field Placement (6668), Moot Court (6644), Graduate Clinical Studies (6697), or Legal Practicum (6695).

Students also need to complete a writing requirement on a topic related to international arbitration, mediation, or other forms of dispute resolution. A journal note, seminar paper, thesis, or independent writing assignment can count towards the concentration.

Students interested in this concentration must notify the program director during the first semester of their LLM degree and complete an online registration form.

Courses

Contracts (6202)

Conflict of Laws (6234)

Commercial Arbitration (6279)

International Litigation (6528)

International Investment Law and Arbitration (6544)

International Arbitration (6556)

International Negotiations (6558)

International Business Transactions Seminar  (6564)

Mediation (6646)

Alternative Dispute Resolution (6647)

Negotiations (6648)

Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution (6676)

International Dispute Resolution (6682)

Arbitration (6685)

International Arbitration in Latin America (6581)*

GW–Oxford Summer Program in International Human Rights Law Courses

The following courses are offered as part of the GW–Oxford Summer Program in International Human Rights Law, which is held during the summer at the University of Oxford.

In addition to the courses listed below, the GW–Oxford program curriculum offers International Law of Human Rights (6546) as Fundamentals of International Human Rights Law; International Criminal Law (6554); and Human Rights Lawyering (6568).

Credit earned in these courses may be applied toward LLM program requirements in International and Comparative Law and the international human rights concentration.

Courses

International Human Rights and Refugee Law (6824)

Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights—Law and Practice (6825)

Human Rights in the Marketplace (6826)

Gender, Sexuality, and International Human Rights Law (6827)

International Rights of Women (6828)

Human Rights Advocacy and Dissemination (6830)

Human Rights in a Digital Age (6831)

Human Rights and Military Responses to Terrorism (6836)

War, Peace, and Human Rights (6838)

Please note: Unless otherwise noted above, the courses below do not count toward the 12-credit International and Comparative Law curriculum requirement.

Courses Related to International and Comparative Law

Admiralty (6293)

Law in Cyberspace (6485)

Art, Cultural Heritage, and the Law Seminar (6488)

Law and Anthropology (6612)

Homeland Security Law and Policy (6876)

Disaster Law (6880)

 

Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program

Co-directors: A. Robinson, S. Saltzburg

LLM in Litigation and Dispute Resolution

24 credits from the following courses are required, including The College of Trial Advocacy (6683) and Pre-Trial in Civil Cases (6677), although students may substitute 6 hours in other courses with permission of the program director.

Courses

Criminal Tax Litigation (6365)

Drugs and the Law (6372)

Mediation (6646)

Alternative Dispute Resolution (6647)

Negotiations (6648)

Advanced Trial Advocacy (6675)

Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution (6676)

Pre-Trial Practice in Civil Cases (6677)

Ethics in Adjudication and Settlement (6678)

Advanced Evidence (6679)

The American Jury (6680)

Negotiation and Conflict Management Systems Design (6681)

International Dispute Resolution (6682)

Pre-Trial Practice in Criminal Cases (6684)

The College of Trial Advocacy (6683)

Arbitration (6685)

Graduate Clinical Studies (6697)

Transnational Security (6885)

Domestic Terrorism (6886)

Problems Trying Terrorists in Article III Courts (6887)

Because the courses in the Litigation and Dispute Resolution program are evaluated solely on the basis of the student’s performance in class, regular class attendance is required and is necessary for successful work in Law 6675 through 6685. Students should consult the syllabus for each course for information on the instructor’s expectations relating to participation and attendance.

Upon the instructor’s finding that a student’s class participation or attendance has been deficient, and after the instructor first attempts to communicate with the student, a grade of No Credit (NC) will be entered unless the student can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the program directors that the absences were for good reason and beyond the student’s control. In such a case, the student will be withdrawn administratively from the course. In all other cases, the grade of NC will remain on the record, though the student will continue to have the option of repeating the course at its next offering by registering and paying tuition.

The law school’s broad curriculum provides unparalleled opportunities for students to develop litigation and dispute resolution skills and simultaneously increase knowledge in a substantive area of law, such as environmental, intellectual property, health, or government procurement law. The directors of the Litigation and Dispute Resolution Program encourage students to consider using 6 of their 24 required hours in substantive or other litigation-related courses.

Courses Related to Litigation and Dispute Resolution

 

 

Criminal Law (6210)

Civil Procedure (6212)

Fundamentals of Lawyering II (6217)

Professional Responsibility and Ethics (6218)

Evidence (6230)

Advanced Evidence Seminar (6231)

Complex Litigation (6236)

Remedies (6238)

Litigation with the Federal Government (6240)

Appellate Practice (6246)

Scientific Evidence Seminar (6248) Civil Procedure Seminar (6249)

Admiralty (6293)

Modern Real Estate Transactions (6330)

Criminal Procedure (6360)

Adjudicatory Criminal Procedure (6362)

White Collar Crime (6364)

Criminal Tax Litigation (6365) Computer Crime (6369)

Forensic Science (6370)

Criminal Law and Procedure Seminar (6379)

Antitrust Law (6402)

Congressional Investigations Seminar (6420)

Lawyers, Lobbying, and the Law (6421)

Environmental and Toxic Torts (6449)

Environmental Negotiations (6458)

Environmental Crimes (6464)

Environmental Lawyering (6469)

The Federal Circuit (6477)

Patent Appellate Practice (6483)

Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights in the U.S. International Trade Commission (6489)

Government Contracts Advocacy (6505)

International Litigation (6528)

Immigration Law I (6538)

Immigration Law II (6539)

International Criminal Law (6554)

 

 

International Arbitration (6556)

International Negotiations (6558)

Human Rights Lawyering (6568)

Professional Responsibility and Ethics

Seminar (6599)

Public Justice Advocacy Clinic (6622)

Prisoner and Reentry Clinic (6623)

Family Justice Litigation Clinic (6624)

Criminal Appeals and Post-Conviction Services Clinic (6625)

Vaccine Injury Litigation Clinic (6626)

Immigration Clinic (6630)

Health Rights Law Clinic (6631)

Civil and Human Rights Clinic (6633)

Rising for Justice (6634)

Intensive Clinical Placement (6638)

Trial Advocacy (6640)

Alternative Dispute Resolution Competition (6642)

Pre-Trial Advocacy (6643)

Mock Trial Competition (6645)

Mediation (6646)

Client Interviewing and Counseling (6650)

Advanced Appellate Advocacy (6653)

Advanced Field Placement (6667)

Field Placement (6668)

Public Interest Lawyering (6670)

Government Lawyering (6671)

The Art of Lawyering (6672)

Field Placement Tutorial (6673)

Graduate Clinical Studies (6697)

Human Rights Advocacy and Dissemination (6830)

European Intellectual Property Law (6852)

Military Justice (6873)

Comparative Military Law (6874)

National Security, Cybersecurity, and Foreign Relations Law Program

Director: L. Schenck; Faculty Co-DirectorsL. Dickinson, E. Swaine; Faculty Advisers: S. Kieff, S. Murphy, D. Solove

LLM in National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law

Students who choose not to write a thesis must complete National Security Law (6870), U.S. Foreign Relations Law (6871), and a minimum of 14 credits from the courses listed below,* including at least 2 credits graded on the basis of a research paper. The research paper must be at least 8,000 words in length, and U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+.

Students who choose to write a thesis must complete National Security Law (6870), U.S. Foreign Relations Law (6871), Thesis (6690), and a minimum of 10 credits from the courses listed below; they are not required to complete a research paper in addition to the thesis.

Courses

Litigation with the Federal Government (6240)

Reading Group (Disinformation and National Security) (6351)

Immigration Criminal Enforcement (6367)

Computer Crime (6369)

Law of Separation of Powers (6384)

Legislation (6416)

Congressional Investigations Seminar (6420)

Veterans Law (6423)

Veterans Advocacy (6428)

Information Privacy Law (6486)

International Law (6520)

International Money Laundering, Corruption, and Terrorism (6521)

Immigration Law I (6538)

Refugee and Asylum Law (6540)

International Law of Human Rights (6546)

Space Law (6548)

Law of the Sea (6550) Law of War (6552)

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation (6553)

International Criminal Law (6554)

Nation Building and the Rule of Law (6559)

Selected Topics in Public International Law (6561)**

Public International Law Seminar (6562)**

Human Trafficking Law (6572)

Field Placement (6668)

Selected Topics in National Security Law (6869)**

National Security Law Seminar (6872)**

Military Justice (6873)

Comparative Military Law (6874)

Counterterrorism Law (6875)

Homeland Security Law and Policy (6876)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Law and Policy (6877) Intelligence Law (6878)

Cybersecurity Law and Policy (6879) Disaster Law (6880)

Artificial Intelligence Law and Policy (6881)

Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (6882)

Counterintelligence Law and Policy (6883)

Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity (6884)

Transnational Security (6885)

Domestic Terrorism (6886)

Problems Trying Terrorists in Article III Courts (6887)

Crisis and Legal Controversy in the CIA (6888)

Aviation Law and National Security (6889)

Cybersecurity Law and Technology (6890)

Foreign Access to U.S. Technology (6891)

Selected Topics in Cybersecurity Law (6892)

*Constitutional Law I (6214) and Constitutional Law II (6380) also will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count these courses toward the 14 credits required in the field.

**For 2022–2023, Public International Law Seminars may include Arms Control and Contemporary Challenges with Respect to the Law of the Sea; National Security Law Seminars may include Internal Investigations and the Inspector General; and Selected Topics in National Security Law may include Law of Secrecy.

LLM in National Security and Cybersecurity Law

Students who choose not to write a thesis must complete National Security Law (6870) and either Cybersecurity Law and Policy (6879) and Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity (6884), or Cybersecurity Law and Technology (6890) along with 5 credits from the following classes:

Courses

Reading Group (Disinformation and National Security) (6351)

Reading Group (Blockchain Law and Policy) (6351)

Computer Crime (6369)

Constitutional Law Seminar (Cyber, Privacy, and Speech) (6399)

Telecommunications Law (6414)

Public Law Seminar (Telecommunication and Technology) (6426)

Computer Law (6484)

Law in Cyberspace (6485)

Information Privacy Law (6486)

Internet Law (6493)

Space Law (6548)

Intelligence Law (6878)

Artificial Intelligence Law and Policy (6881)

Counterintelligence Law and Policy (6883)

Foreign Access to U.S. Technology (6891)

Selected Topics in Cybersecurity Law (6892)

and a minimum of 8 additional credits from either the courses listed above or below,* including at least 2 credits graded on the basis of a research paper. The research paper must be at least 8,000 words in length, and U.S. law school graduates must achieve a minimum grade of B+. (Note: Students who receive credit for Law 6879, Cybersecurity Law and Policy or Law 6884, Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity may not enroll in Law 6890, Cybersecurity Law and Technology).

Students who choose to write a thesis must complete National Security Law (6870) and either Cybersecurity Law and Policy (6879) and Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity (6884), or Cybersecurity Law and Technology (6890) Thesis (6690-91), along with 5 credits from the classes listed above, and a minimum of 4 additional credits from the courses listed above or below; they are not required to complete a research paper in addition to the thesis. (Note: Students who receive credit for Law 6879, Cybersecurity Law and Policy or Law 6884, Technology Foundations for Cybersecurity may not enroll in Law 6890, Cybersecurity Law and Technology).

Courses

Immigration Criminal Enforcement (6367)

Law of Separation of Powers (6384)

Legislation (6416)

Congressional Investigations Seminar (6420)

International Law (6520)

International Money Laundering, Corruption, and Terrorism (6521)

Immigration Law I (6538)

Refugee and Asylum Law (6540)

International Law of Human Rights (6546)

Space Law (6548)

Law of the Sea (6550)

Law of War (6552)

U.S. Export Control Law and Regulation (6553)

International Criminal Law (6554)

Nation Building and the Rule of the Law (6559)

Public International Law Seminar (6562)**

 Human Trafficking Law (6572)

Field Placement (6668)

Selected Topics in National Security Law (6869)**

U.S. Foreign Relations Law (6871)

National Security Law Seminar (6872)** 

Military Justice (6873)

Comparative Military Justice (6874)

Counterterrorism Law (6875)

Homeland Security Law and Policy (6876)

Nuclear Nonproliferation Law and Policy (6877)

Disaster Law (6880)

Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (6882)

Transnational Security (6885)

Domestic Terrorism (6886)

Problems Trying Terrorists in Article III Courts (6887)

Crisis and Legal Controversy in the CIA (6888)

Aviation Law and National Security (6889)

*Constitutional Law I (6214) and Constitutional Law II (6380) also will be available; only students with a non-U.S. law degree who plan to take the New York bar examination may count these courses toward the 14 credits required in the field.

**For 2022–2023, Public International Law Seminars may include Arms Control and Contemporary Challenges with Respect to the Law of the Sea; National Security Law Seminars may include Internal Investigations and the Inspector General; and Selected Topics in National Security Law may include Law of Secrecy.

Joint Master of Laws–Master’s Degree Programs

The law school offers joint degree programs for LLM candidates with two other schools of the University. The LLM–MPH is offered with the School of Public Health and Health Services for students who are pursuing a General LLM or the LLM in Environmental Law. The LLM–MA (in the field of history with a concentration in U.S. legal history; in the field of women’s, gender, sexuality studies; or in the field of public policy with a concentration in women’s, gender, sexuality studies) is offered with Columbian College of Arts and Sciences for students who are pursuing the LLM in International and Comparative Law. Students must be admitted both to the law school and, separately, to the school that confers the other master’s degree. Each school must separately approve a student’s application to pursue a joint degree program. The joint degrees must be conferred simultaneously and only after all requirements for both degrees have been met.

The law school will allow 6 credit hours of work completed in the other master’s program to count toward completion of the 24 credit hours required for the LLM degree. The grade of Credit (CR) or No Credit (NC) will be recorded for such courses; a student must receive a grade of at least B- to receive a grade of CR. Law students receive 1 credit hour for each 700 minutes of scheduled class time in a semester; therefore, a law student may in some cases earn only 2 credits for a course offered by another school of the University for 3 credits.

A number of other regulations govern the joint degree programs. Students interested in entering one of these programs should consult with the appropriate admissions offices.


Academic Regulations

Academic Evaluation

Grades

Letter grades are given with numerical equivalents as follows.

 

 

A+ = 4.33

A = 4.0

 

 

B+ = 3.33

B = 3.0

 

 

C+ = 2.33

C = 2.0

 

 

D = 1.0

F = 0

Graduate students may not elect to take graded courses on a Credit/No Credit (CR/NC) basis. No credit toward the degree is awarded when graduate students earn grades below C- for

U.S. law school graduates in the program and grades below D for non-U.S. law school graduates and MSL candidates. The cumulative average of a student includes all grades in all courses taken while a candidate for a given degree.

 

No grade may be changed by an instructor after it has been posted or disclosed to a student unless there has been an arithmetic or administrative error that has been certified in writing by the instructor.

A student has the right to faculty peer review of complaints of “prejudiced or capricious academic evaluation” under the regulations outlined in The George Washington University Guide to Students’ Rights and Responsibilities. To initiate such a review, the student must submit a letter and supporting documentation to the Dean of Students Office by the last day of classes of the semester following the semester or summer session in which the grade for an examination, paper, or other work product was awarded. The student has the burden of making a prima facie case, with appropriate documentation, that the grade was prejudiced or capricious. Mere disagreement with the grade is not a sufficient basis for initiating a faculty peer review.

Method of Evaluation

The method of evaluation is indicated at the end of each course description in this Bulletin, and a student’s grade in the course will be determined in large part on that basis. In most courses, a final examination is held during the examination period. These courses are marked “examination.” Additional written work requirements are indicated by notations such as “drafting assignments” or “problem assignments.” Some courses are marked “take-home examination,” indicating that the instructor will determine the method by which the examination is administered outside of the classroom.

Courses that require the preparation of a major research paper in lieu of an examination are marked “research paper.” Some courses are marked “examination or research paper with permission of the instructor.” In such cases, an examination will be scheduled but the instructor may grant permission for a number of students to write a research paper in lieu of the examination.

Experiential Learning courses are usually graded on the basis of simulation, role-playing, and/or some form of written assignment and may be marked, for example, “drafting assignments” or “simulation and paper.”

Participation

Once a student has been evaluated in a course using the method indicated in the course description, the instructor may raise or lower the student’s grade on the basis of class participation.

For courses in which the sole method of evaluation listed in this Bulletin is an examination (whether in-class or take-home), a student’s grade may be raised or lowered for class participation by only one grade step, e.g., from B to B+, or B to B-, provided that the instructor so notifies the students in the syllabus. For all other courses, instructors intending to consider class participation in the final grade determination should state in the syllabus the weight it will be accorded.

Honors

The degree of Master of Laws “With Highest Honors” is awarded to those students who obtain a minimum cumulative average of 3.67.

Failure to Take an Examination

Written examinations are held at the end of most courses. Every student is required to take the regular examinations at their scheduled dates and times. If a student fails to take an examination, a grade of F will be recorded unless the student has been excused from the examination or has obtained permission from the Dean of Students Office to drop the course.

The Dean of Students Office will grant an examination excusal only for a documented illness or other documented emergency. Travel or scheduling conflicts do not constitute an emergency, nor do multiple examinations on the same date or examinations on consecutive dates. The request for excusal must be made during the examination period and the supporting documents must be submitted to the Dean of Students Office no later than one month after the date of the examination.

 

A student who has been granted an excused absence by the Dean of Student for a written examination will take the examination as soon thereafter as can be arranged, but no later than the Friday of the seventh week of the fall or spring semester following the excusal. The instructor has discretion as to whether the make-up examination is evaluated as a letter grade or as Credit/ No Credit (CR/NC). For credit, a minimum grade of C- is required for LLM candidates.

A student who fails to complete the make-up examination before the Friday of the seventh week of classes without an approved excused absence by the Dean of Students Office will receive a grade of F for the course.

Summer and Exchange Programs

For all Summer and Exchange programs, unless excused by the Dean of Students Office for extraordinary circumstances, any missed examination must be made up on-site. If excused, absent extraordinary circumstances, a make-up exam must be scheduled before end of the summer session.

Deadlines for Courses Graded by Evaluations Other than In-Class Examinations

As indicated in course descriptions, many courses are graded on the basis of research papers, take-home examinations, appellate briefs, drafting assignments, litigation exercises, negotiation exercises, oral arguments, oral presentations, problem assignments, projects, short papers, simulations, or writing assignments.

To receive a letter grade for a research paper, a student must submit the paper by the date specified by the instructor, or, if the instructor has not specified a due date, by the last day of classes in the semester. For courses taken in the fall semester, the instructor may extend the due date to no later than January 15. For courses taken in the spring semester, the instructor may extend the due date to no later than June 15, unless the student intends to graduate at the end of the semester, in which case the paper must be submitted by the last day of the examination period. For courses taken in the summer session, the deadline will be August 15.

To receive a letter grade for any required assignment other than a research paper, a student must submit the assignment by the date specified by the instructor, or, if the instructor has not specified a due date, by the last day of classes. An instructor may extend the due date to the last day of the examination period in the semester.

In the event of any inconsistency between statements by a course instructor or in an individual course syllabus, the deadlines, rules, and statements set forth in this Bulletin will govern. Although no letter grade can be awarded for extensions beyond the foregoing deadlines, the instructor may, for sufficient reason, extend a deadline for the submission up to the last day of the examination period of the following semester; further extensions may be granted only in exceptional circumstances and must be approved in writing by the instructor and the Dean of Students Office. When the deadline is extended beyond those indicated for receiving a letter grade, the following conditions apply:

  1. no student will earn any credit for the course for any purpose until assignments acceptable to the instructor have been submitted;
  2. the only grade the student may receive for the course is Credit (CR) or No Credit (NC). To earn a grade of CR, a minimum evaluation of C- is required for LLM candidates. Failure to submit all required assignments within the extended deadline will result in a grade of F.
Changes in Program of Study

Master of Laws candidates may add, drop or withdraw from a course subject to the deadlines and limitations below:

Deadline

Term Length of Course Add Course Drop Without Transcript Notation Withdraw With Transcript Notation (W)
Fall/Spring Whole semester End of Add/Drop Period End of Add/Drop Period 5 pm Friday of the 7th week of the semester
Fall/Spring Compressed End Add/Drop Period End of Add/Drop Period No later than the end of 60% of the scheduled course length
Summer Whole term End of Add/Drop Period End of Add/Drop Period No later than the end of 60% of the scheduled course length
Summer Compressed End of Add/Drop Period End of Add/Drop Period 5 pm Friday of the 5th week of the term

 

Students seeking to withdraw from a course after the add/drop deadline, but before Friday of the 7th week of class must have the permission of both the Dean of Students Office and the Instructor. If permission is granted, these students will receive a transcript notation of Withdrawn (W). For courses without a classroom component, which may include but are not limited to, Field Placements and External Competitions, permission to withdraw will only be granted in extraordinary circumstances.

Students seeking to withdraw from a fall or spring course after the 7th week of class, but before Friday of the 11th week of class, will earn No Credit (NC) and must have the permission of the Dean of Students Office and the Instructor. For summer courses, the deadline is the 4th week. Adjustments of Field Placement credits are not subject to this rule, though all requirements of the Field Placement Program must be satisfied in making Field Placement credit adjustments. Any schedule changes made after the start of the semester may result in changes to Financial Aid disbursements, revocation of scholarship and may result in tuition being owed back to the school. The Financial Aid Office must be consulted for any impact that schedule adjustments may make after the start of the semester.

In certain extraordinary circumstances, students will be permitted to add courses without classroom components such as Independent Legal Writing after the add/drop period with the permission of the Dean of Students and the Instructor. Under no circumstances may a student withdraw from a course after the last day of the semester.

Credit for Courses Taken in Other GW Schools

Master of Laws candidates are permitted to take graduate courses related to their fields of interest in other schools of this University with the permission of their program director. A maximum of 6 credit hours will be credited toward the degree for such courses. The grade of Credit (CR) or No Credit (NC) will be recorded for such courses; a student must earn a grade of at least B- to receive a grade of CR.

Law students receive 1 credit hour for each 700 minutes of scheduled class time in a semester; therefore, a law student may in some cases earn only 2 credits for a course offered by another school of the University for 3 credits.

For graduate courses offered for 1.5 credits, the law school will recognize only 1 credit on the student’s transcript. Additional work cannot be undertaken to increase the course to 2 credits. Enrollment units will correspond to the existing table of units at .075 for 1 credit.

Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area, Inc.

A candidate for the Master of Laws degree may take graduate courses at Georgetown University Law Center through the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. A maximum of 6 credit hours of such courses may be credited toward the master’s degree.

Permission to take Consortium courses must be granted by the law school’s Dean of Students Office and the registrar of Georgetown University Law Center. The grade of Credit (CR) or No Credit (NC) will be recorded for such courses. To receive the grade of CR, a student must attain a grade of C- or higher.

Readmission

A student who fails to register for one or more semesters will be required to apply for readmission in order to continue in the degree program. Application for readmission should be made to the relevant program director.

Readmitted students will not receive academic credit for course work completed more than five years prior to the date of the readmission request. Petitions for exceptions to this policy should be addressed to the relevant program director and the senior associate dean for academic affairs and will be granted only in exceptional circumstances.

Attendance

Regular class attendance is required and is necessary for successful work. A student who is deficient in class attendance or participation will, after the instructor or Dean of Students Office attempts to communicate with the student, have a grade of No Credit (NC) entered on the record absent an excuse. (Here, as elsewhere in this Bulletin, email correspondence to a student’s official law school email address is one fully acceptable means for student notification).

No excuse for deficient attendance or participation will be granted except by the Dean of Students Office and then only upon proof of unexpected serious illness, injury, or another emergency. A student whose excuse is accepted by the Dean of Students Office will be withdrawn administratively from the course.

Registration Holds

Students may not attend classes in any semester or summer session without the express written permission of the Dean of Students Office if they have not registered due to a hold on their student account. Failure to adhere to registration and enrollment procedures could result in a violation of the Academic Integrity Code and/or the University’s Code of Student Conduct, both of which are reported to bar examiners.

Exclusion and Probation for Violation of Law School or University Codes

A student who is excluded from further study due to an indefinite suspension and/or conditional suspension under the law school Academic Integrity Code, or a student who is suspended for violation of the University Code of Student Conduct, must petition the Academic Scholarship Committee for reinstatement to the law school. A student who has been excluded should contact the Dean of Students Office for guidance on the procedure for readmission. There is no guarantee of readmission to the law school.

Procedure for Reinstatement

Any student excluded from study for reasons outlined above or in the section University Regulations—Right to Dismiss Students, may petition the Academic Scholarship Committee for reinstatement in accordance with the petition guidelines available from the Dean of Students Office. The review of any such petition may include, among others, the following considerations in appropriate cases:

  1. whether the excluded student has the capacity to pursue the study of law with a definite likelihood of success;
  2. whether the excluded student demonstrates the requisite character and fitness to earn the endorsement of the law school in the application process for admission to a state bar for a license to practice law;
  3. whether the conditions leading to the exclusion from study have abated or come under sufficient control to allow complete and constructive engagement in the study of law and with members of the law school and University community;
  4. whether the excluded student has met the conditions stipulated in the decision of the relevant committee or authority, whether the law school, University, or other relevant authority; and
  5. whether the student can persuasively demonstrate that they will comply with the highest standards of academic integrity during future work at the law school.

The Academic Scholarship Committee may place academic or other conditions on a student’s reinstatement. For example, the Committee may require that the student take specific courses; maintain a specified grade point average; enroll in a limited number of total credits; limit outside employment; have in place adequate health or tuition insurance; or submit evidence of ongoing appropriate medical treatment. Reinstatement is required after a leave of absence for medical or mental health care subject to the procedures provided by the Dean of Students Office.

General Information

Day and Evening Classes

Most day classes are scheduled between 8:50 am and 5:50 pm, Monday through Friday. The majority of evening classes meet from 6 pm to 8 pm, Monday through Friday, or 6 pm to 9:05 pm, Monday through Thursday. There may be an occasional Saturday or Sunday course offering.

A 4-credit course, e.g., Evidence, meets two evenings a week; many 3-credit courses, e.g., Administrative Law, meet one evening a week plus alternate Friday evenings throughout the semester; a 2-credit course, e.g., Estate Planning, meets one evening a week.

The part-time (evening) program conforms to the academic standards of the day program, with full-time faculty teaching all courses in the core curriculum. Examinations for both day and evening classes may be given in the afternoon.

Examinations for day students may be given in the evening.

Registration

Each student must register before attending classes. No student will be registered until proper credentials have been filed. See Admission Process. No registration is accepted for less than a semester or summer session. A student may not register concurrently in the George Washington University and another institution. Registration in more than one school of the University requires the written permission of the appropriate deans concerned prior to registration.

Eligibility for Registration

A student who is suspended or whose record is not clear for any reason is not eligible to register.

New Student

Upon receipt of a final letter of admission, a new student is eligible for registration on the stated days of registration.

Readmitted Student

A student previously registered who was not registered for courses during the preceding semester or summer session and who has not been granted a leave of absence must apply for and receive a letter of readmission before becoming eligible for registration.

Graduation Requirements

Degrees are conferred in January, May, and September.

To be recommended by the faculty for graduation, a student must have met the admission requirements of the law school; completed satisfactorily the scholarship, curriculum, enrollment unit, and other requirements for the degree for which the student is registered; filed an application for graduation by the published deadline date; and be free from all indebtedness to the University. Enrollment is required for the semester or summer at the close of which the degree is to be conferred.

Participation in the Commencement Ceremony

Participation in the annual commencement ceremony held in May is open to students who have applied to graduate in the current spring semester or who graduated in the preceding fall semester or summer session.

With the exception of doctoral candidates, all graduate students who need no more than 9 credits to complete their degree requirements may participate in May commencement ceremonies if there is a reasonable expectation that they will be able to obtain the needed credits during the following summer. The requirement of a maximum 9 credits is firm and not subject to petition.

 

Application for Graduation

An application for graduation must be filed by the published deadline date during the last semester or summer session of the final year. Students completing degree requirements during the summer session and fall semester will be awarded diplomas (no formal convocation) in September and January, respectively, provided they have completed all degree requirements and have applied for graduation as part of registration. Such students may participate in the May Commencement.

Transcripts of Record

Official transcripts of student records will be issued by the University’s Office of the Registrar on request of the student or former student who has a clear financial record. A fee is charged for each transcript.

Academic Integrity Code

The law school seeks to foster academic excellence in the study of law and to prepare students for participation in the legal profession. Academic excellence, in any discipline, depends on an environment of honesty, integrity, and fairness. This general requirement is heightened by the special mission of a law school—to prepare students for a practice that relies heavily on the honor of its participants. The law school community expects its members to uphold the highest ethical standards. It expects students to prepare for the duties of honesty and integrity that they will undertake as lawyers by practicing honesty and integrity throughout their time as students.

The responsibility for creating and maintaining academic integrity in the law school community is shared by all members of the community—students, faculty, staff, and deans. The George Washington University Law School Academic Integrity Code (PDF) defines and prohibits academic dishonesty. It prescribes procedures to be followed in cases of academic dishonesty. It also exhorts all members of the law school community to foster a culture of honesty, integrity, and professional responsibility throughout the law school community.

It is the responsibility of all students to read and familiarize themselves with the Code and also the University’s Guide to Student Rights and Responsibilities, both of which are available from the Dean of Students Office. If, in light of the law school community’s norm of academic integrity, the propriety of certain conduct is in doubt, students must seek the advice of law school faculty or administrators. Members of the law school community are presumed to be familiar with the Academic Integrity Code and are responsible for conforming to its requirements.

Students who are charged with violations of the Academic Integrity Code or the University’s Code of Student Conduct, whether they are found responsible for such charges and/or applicable sanctions, must report any and all charges and their disposition to state bar examiners if so required on the bar application form. The law school will similarly report any charges or sanctions to state bar examiners when the bar certification form requires such a disclosure.

Academic Integrity Code